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I'm learning about database indexes right now, and I'm trying to understand the efficient of using them.

  • I'd like to see whether a specific query uses an index.
  • I want to actually see the difference between executing the query using an index, and without using the index (so I want to see the execution plan for my query).

I am using sql+.

How do I see the execution plan and where can I found in it the information telling me whether my index was used or not?

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Try using this code to first explain and then see the plan:

Explain the plan:

explain plan for (select * from table_name where ...);

See the plan:

select * from table(dbms_xplan.display);
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2  
note the parenthesis in the top query are not needed – Craig Aug 3 '12 at 18:10
    
of course... it looks good this way. Doesn't it? – justCallMeBiru Aug 3 '12 at 18:25
    
haha.. yeah.. I was just saying for the OP, just in case their query is large and it is a pain adding in the parens. – Craig Aug 3 '12 at 19:34
    
Please edit and remove the brackets in explain plan. It should be explain plan for select * from table_name where ...; community.oracle.com/thread/606464?start=0&tstart=0 – Zaki Anwar Hamdani Mar 22 at 1:31

Take a look at Explain Plan. EXPLAIN works across many db types.

For sqlPlus specifically, see sqlplus's AUTO TRACE facility.

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Try this:

http://www.dba-oracle.com/t_explain_plan.htm

The execution plan will mention the index whenever it is used. Just read through the execution plan.

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