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I want to be able to create structs with each having a member that indicates the struct's (not the object's) order. There should be no run-time overhead, and I should be able to use the ordinal at compile-time.

The simples approach doesn't work because for some reason static variables don't work at compile-time:

int nextOrdinal() {
  static int ordinal;
  return ordinal++;
}

struct S1 {
  enum ordinal = nextOrdinal();
}

struct S2 {
  enum ordinal = nextOrdinal();
}

How the structs are created isn't important to me at this moment. The problem seems to be that it's not possible to retain a state at compile-time, am I correct?

--Inspired by Boost.units dimensional analysis.

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2 Answers 2

There are no variables at compile-time (excepting the very special case of inside of a CTFE function)--everything must be constant. Further, allowing CTFE variables to go static and pollute the interpreted environment would be a pretty iffy design choice.

Part of the problem is that the compiler doesn't make any guarantees (to my knowledge) about the order of compilation of various code units and may even (in the future) be able to compile pieces in parallel. In general you need to treat compile-time programming as a very strict functional environment with small pockets of flexible mutability (inside CTFE functions). To ensure consistency, CTFE-able functions must be pure and "Ex­e­cuted ex­pres­sions may not ref­er­ence any global or local sta­tic vari­ables." http://dlang.org/function.html#interpretation

In short, I don't think there's any way to have the compiler store this state for you.

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True, I don't think there is a way to have the compiler store the state, but there is a way to assign unique ordinal numbers to structs at compile time. I'll post my solution soon. –  Arlen Aug 3 '12 at 18:04
    
If the programmer supplies them, sure. And having the compiler check uniqueness should be quite possible since it does that anyways (e.g. two structs in the same module with the same name). –  Justin W Aug 3 '12 at 18:07
    
right, but you can't do it with structs because you could have local and global structs that have the same names and they won't produce compile-time errors. –  Arlen Aug 3 '12 at 18:11

I don't know of a reliable way to do this, but if you want to order them based on their location in the source file you could do this:

import std.conv;
import std.stdio;

size_t nextOrdinal(size_t line = __LINE__)()
{
    return line;
}

struct S1 {
    enum ordinal = nextOrdinal();
}

struct S2 {
    enum ordinal = nextOrdinal();
}

void main()
{
    writeln(S1.ordinal);
    writeln(S2.ordinal);
}

If you have multiple files that call nextOrdinal you could end up with struct definitions which have the same ordinal value. You might consider encoding the file name too:

size_t nextOrdinal(string file = __FILE__, size_t line = __LINE__)()
{
    size_t res;

    foreach (ch; file)
        res += ch;

    return res + line;
}
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That won't work because you could have multiple structs defined on the same line. I do, however, have a solution that I might post later; it asks the users to supply the ordinal number and it produces a compile-time error if that ordinal number has been used before. –  Arlen Aug 3 '12 at 18:02
1  
I've assumed you wanted everything to be automatic. I don't know who writes multiple struct definitions on the same line tbh. :) –  Andrej M. Aug 3 '12 at 19:30

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