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I have a class something like this:

template<typename T>
class wrapper
{
public:
    operator const T & () const
    {
        return value;
    }
private:
    T value;
};

I then use it with a struct like this:

struct point { float x; float y; };

//...

wrapper<point> myPoint;
std::cout << myPoint.x;// error: no member x or whatever.

I'm wondering if there's a way to allow this without having to do ((point)myPoint).x. I know that I can overload the -> operator but I'd prefer not to since its supposed to "pretend" to be a non-pointer.

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You can say static_cast<point const &>(myPoint).x. –  Kerrek SB Aug 3 '12 at 16:23
3  
Sorry, not possible. –  Xeo Aug 3 '12 at 16:23
    
You could change the cast operator to operator() and use myPoint().x; if the length is what you're trying to avoid. It makes less sense than operator->, though. –  chris Aug 3 '12 at 16:26
    
I edited to fix two typos. –  Johan Lundberg Aug 3 '12 at 16:28
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2 Answers

You can achieve something similar with -> instead of .:

template<typename T>
class wrapper
{
public:
    operator const T & () const // will this still be needed now?
    {
        return value;
    }

    T* operator->() { return &value; }
    T const* operator->() const { return &value; }

private:
    T value;
};

And then:

struct point { float x; float y; }

//...

wrapper<point> myPoint; // this needs to be initialised!
std::cout << myPoint->x;
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@Mr.Anubis oh yes, you're right. That was copied straight from the question. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 3 '12 at 16:29
    
This is nice and all, but would it not make more sense to have a .GetValue() operator? –  Johan Lundberg Aug 3 '12 at 16:30
2  
@JohanLundberg How could I know which makes more sense? I don't know what a wrapper is supposed to be. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 3 '12 at 16:31
    
@JohanLundberg: The problem is that you cannot do this with .. Among the alternatives, operator-> is the one that probably makes the most sense. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 3 '12 at 16:35
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes, right. –  Johan Lundberg Aug 3 '12 at 17:16
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You cannot make your wrapper class pretend to be a real class the way you described. The main reason is that member selection (.) operator cannot be overloaded.

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