Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to find the most recently modified file in a directory.

I know I can loop through every file in a folder and compare File.GetLastWriteTime, but is there a better way to do this without looping?.

share|improve this question
9  
No there is no better way which avoids looping. Even using LINQ just hides the looping into some deeper functionality where you can't see it directly. –  Oliver May 17 '10 at 11:52
    
If you wanted to find the most recently modified file(s) on the whole filesystem, then the NTFS Change Journal would be useful. Very very hard to use from C#, though. –  Ben Voigt May 27 '14 at 20:56

8 Answers 8

up vote 113 down vote accepted

how about something like this...

var directory = new DirectoryInfo("C:\\MyDirectory");
var myFile = (from f in directory.GetFiles()
             orderby f.LastWriteTime descending
             select f).First();

// or...
var myFile = directory.GetFiles()
             .OrderByDescending(f => f.LastWriteTime)
             .First();
share|improve this answer
38  
Personally, I find that the non-sugared version is easier to read: directory.GetFiles().OrderByDescending(f => f.LastWriteTime).First() –  Jørn Schou-Rode Jul 24 '09 at 20:32
1  
yeah, i agree most of the time too - but when giving examples the query syntax makes it a bit more obvious that it's a linq query. I'll update the example with both options to clarify. –  Scott Ivey Jul 24 '09 at 20:48
2  
Thanks! Now I just need to convince my boss to expedite the process of upgrading us from .net 2.0 so I can use Linq :) –  Chris Klepeis Jul 24 '09 at 20:54
1  
you can use linq with 2.0 SP1 with a little extra work - just reference the System.Core.dll file from 3.5, and set it to "copy local" –  Scott Ivey Jul 24 '09 at 21:19
1  
@SiKni8, it should work the same. You'd just need to escape your backslashes. DirectoryInfo(@"\\myserver\myfolder") or DirectoryInfo("\\\\myserver\\myfolder") should both work. –  Scott Ivey Apr 10 '14 at 13:07

If you want to search recursively, you can use this beautiful piece of code:

public static FileInfo GetNewestFile(DirectoryInfo directory) {
   return directory.GetFiles()
       .Union(directory.GetDirectories().Select(d => GetNewestFile(d)))
       .OrderByDescending(f => (f == null ? DateTime.MinValue : f.LastWriteTime))
       .FirstOrDefault();                        
}

Just call it the following way:

FileInfo newestFile = GetNewestFile(new DirectoryInfo(@"C:\directory\"));

and that's it. Returns a FileInfo instance or null if the directory is empty.

share|improve this answer
3  
Or you can use the recursive search option. –  ricksmt May 12 '14 at 22:12
    
Nice code. it is really helpful. –  Monika Jul 11 '14 at 6:06

A non-LINQ version:

/// <summary>
/// Returns latest writen file from the specified directory.
/// If the directory does not exist or doesn't contain any file, DateTime.MinValue is returned.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="directoryInfo">Path of the directory that needs to be scanned</param>
/// <returns></returns>
private static DateTime GetLatestWriteTimeFromFileInDirectory(DirectoryInfo directoryInfo)
{
    if (directoryInfo == null || !directoryInfo.Exists)
        return DateTime.MinValue;

    FileInfo[] files = directoryInfo.GetFiles();
    DateTime lastWrite = DateTime.MinValue;

    foreach (FileInfo file in files)
    {
        if (file.LastWriteTime > lastWrite)
        {
            lastWrite = file.LastWriteTime;
        }
    }

    return lastWrite;
}

/// <summary>
/// Returns file's latest writen timestamp from the specified directory.
/// If the directory does not exist or doesn't contain any file, null is returned.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="directoryInfo">Path of the directory that needs to be scanned</param>
/// <returns></returns>
private static FileInfo GetLatestWritenFileFileInDirectory(DirectoryInfo directoryInfo)
{
    if (directoryInfo == null || !directoryInfo.Exists)
        return null;

    FileInfo[] files = directoryInfo.GetFiles();
    DateTime lastWrite = DateTime.MinValue;
    FileInfo lastWritenFile = null;

    foreach (FileInfo file in files)
    {
        if (file.LastWriteTime > lastWrite)
        {
            lastWrite = file.LastWriteTime;
            lastWritenFile = file;
        }
    }
    return lastWritenFile;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry , didn't see the fact that you did not want to loop. Anyway... perhaps it will help someone searching something similar –  TimothyP Nov 23 '09 at 7:52
1  
This code does not compile. - lastUpdatedFile should not be an array. - The initial value for lastUpdate is invalid (0001/0/0). –  Lars A. Brekken May 13 '10 at 21:38

Expanding on the first one above, if you want to search for a certain pattern you may use the following code:

string pattern = "*.txt"
var dirInfo = new DirectoryInfo(directory);
var file = (from f in dirInfo.GetFiles(pattern) orderby f.LastWriteTime descending select f).First();
share|improve this answer

it's a bit late but...

your code will not work, because of list<FileInfo> lastUpdateFile = null; and later lastUpdatedFile.Add(file); so NullReference exception will be thrown. Working version should be:

private List<FileInfo> GetLastUpdatedFileInDirectory(DirectoryInfo directoryInfo)
{
    FileInfo[] files = directoryInfo.GetFiles();
    List<FileInfo> lastUpdatedFile = new List<FileInfo>();
    DateTime lastUpdate = DateTime.MinValue;
    foreach (FileInfo file in files)
    {
        if (file.LastAccessTime > lastUpdate)
        {
            lastUpdatedFile.Add(file);
            lastUpdate = file.LastAccessTime;
        }
    }

    return lastUpdatedFile;
}

Thanks

share|improve this answer

You can react to new file activity with FileSystemWatcher.

share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't work because a file can be modified while his application is not running. –  Francis B. Jul 24 '09 at 20:27
    
he didn't give that kind of detail... How do we know it isn't a persistant app? –  scottmarlowe Jul 24 '09 at 20:46
    
We don't, but Scott has a better solution what works in both cases. –  Badaro Jul 24 '09 at 21:12
private List<FileInfo> GetLastUpdatedFileInDirectory(DirectoryInfo directoryInfo)
{
    FileInfo[] files = directoryInfo.GetFiles();
    List<FileInfo> lastUpdatedFile = null;
    DateTime lastUpdate = new DateTime(1, 0, 0);
    foreach (FileInfo file in files)
    {
        if (file.LastAccessTime > lastUpdate)
        {
            lastUpdatedFile.Add(file);
            lastUpdate = file.LastAccessTime;
        }
    }

    return lastUpdatedFile;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Some explanation would have been nice, here –  Andrew Barber Oct 28 '12 at 3:44
    
I think the code is pretty clear and doesn't need any explanations. –  vikasde Sep 11 '14 at 15:59

Here's a version that gets the most recent file from each subdirectory

List<string> reports = new List<string>();    
DirectoryInfo directory = new DirectoryInfo(ReportsRoot);
directory.GetFiles("*.xlsx", SearchOption.AllDirectories).GroupBy(fl => fl.DirectoryName)
.ForEach(g => reports.Add(g.OrderByDescending(fi => fi.LastWriteTime).First().FullName));
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.