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I have a reusable component implemented as an MVC3 PartialView. The component includes jquery-ui widgets which need javascript initialization code to run. The following is a simplified example:

==== MySimplifiedPartialView.cshtml ====

<div id="myTabs">
    <ul>
        <li><a href="#myTabs-tab1">Tab 1</a></li>
        <li><a href="#myTabs-tab2">Tab 2</a></li>
        <li><a href="#myTabs-tab3">Tab 3</a></li>
        <li><a href="#myTabs-tab4">Tab 4</a></li>
    </ul>
    <div id="myTabs-tab1">
       ...content
    </div>
    <div id="myTabs-tab2">
       ... content
    </div>
    ... etc ...
</div>
<script type="text/javascript">
    $(document).ready(function () {
        $("#myTabs").tabs();
    });
</script>

When this PartialView is loaded into a page normally, the initialization code in $(document).ready is run and the widgets are initialized properly (in this case as jquery-ui tabs).

However I also want to be able to load this PartialView into the DOM dynamically, e.g. as the result of an AJAX request. What is the usual way to ensure the initialization code is run in this case? In ASP.NET WebForms apps, I would use an UpdatePanel, and achieve this by handling the load event, e.g.:

Sys.Application.add_load(function () {
    $("#myTabs").tabs();
});

What is the equivalent in an MVC3 applications?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have a couple of options. Easiest is often to include the script in the partial view:

<div id="#partial_view">Here is content in my partial view</div>
<script type="text/javascript">
    (function($) {
        $('#partial_view #myTabs').tabs();
    } (jQuery));
</script>

tsegay also shows that you can do it during your ajax success event.

As a variation on the second option, since you are worried about encapsulation, is to initialize the javascript behaviors unobtrusively. For example:

<div data-tabs="true">Here is content in my partial view</div>

You can then encapsulate the initialization into a common object like so:

<script type="text/javascript">
    (function($) {
        $.myApp = {
            obtruders: {}
        };

        // apply obtrusive behaviors
        $.myApp.obtrude = function (selector, obtruders) {
            var obtruder;
            obtruders = obtruders || $.myApp.obtruders;
            for (obtruder in obtruders) { // execute every registered obtruder
                if (obtruders.hasOwnProperty(obtruder)) { // skip any inherited members

                    // apply an unobtrusive behavior
                    if (typeof obtruders[obtruder] === 'function') {
                        obtruders[obtruder].apply(this,
                            Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0, 1) || document);
                    }

                    // apply all unobtrusive behaviors in set
                    if (typeof obtruders[obtruder] === 'object') {
                        $.myApp.obtrude(selector, obtruders[obtruder]);
                    }
                }
            }
        };

        // apply tabs behavior
        $.extend($.myApp.obtruders, {
            tabs: function (selector) {
                $(selector).find('[data-tabs=true]').tabs();
            }
        });

        $(function() {
            // initialize unobtrusive behaviors
            $.myApp.obtrude(document);
        );

    } (jQuery));
</script>

There is some initial setup in the code above, but ultimately you can do this during your ajax success event:

success: function(html) {
    $('#partial_placeholder').html(html);
    $.myApp.obtrude($('#partial_placeholder'));
}

The view doesn't need to know that it has to call .tabs() on anything in the partial view, just that the partial has some unobtrusive UX behaviors. You can do the same thing with unobtrusive datepickers or other things that need initialized. All you would need is another $.extend section in the $.myApp object:

// apply datepickers
$.extend($.myApp.obtruders, {
    datepickers: function(selector) {
        $(selector).find('[data-datepicker=true]').datepicker();
    }
});

Another advantage of this is that you don't need to do any initialization on your normal (non-partial) views. The $(function(){..}); at the end of the big script above takes care of that for you by calling $myApp.obtrude(document) when the script first loads into the browser.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. All examples I've seen place the initialization code in a $(document).ready event handler (or Sys.Application.add_load for ASP.NET Ajax). You're suggesting executing the code immediately. Are there any gotchas with this approach? –  Joe Aug 3 '12 at 17:19
    
Note entirely sure what it means, but according to the jQuery documentation of the .ajax() method If html is specified, any embedded JavaScript inside the retrieved data is executed before the HTML is returned as a string. Does that mean that the JavaScript gets executed before you've had the possibilty to add the HTML to the DOM? In that case I guess there will be a problem, since no content will match the selector of the fetched jQuery at the time of execution. –  Christofer Eliasson Aug 3 '12 at 17:23
    
There can be gotchas, depending on where you load the jquery reference. I load mine last, just before the </body> tag. If you load them in <head>, not much you need to worry about. If you load it at the end, then any $ references in your partials should get wrapped into a self-executing anonymous function, like in my answer. It works a bit like $(document).ready(). –  danludwig Aug 3 '12 at 17:25
    
@danludwig, thanks for the comprehensive answer. Your "unobtrusive behaviors" seems to be what I'm looking for. I'm surprised I haven't found something like this when googling, as I assumed that mine is a fairly mainstream requirement. –  Joe Aug 3 '12 at 18:30
    
@Joe I originally wrote about this here: programmers.stackexchange.com/q/124493/42738 ... if you want to read more about it. Yet another option may be to encapsulate the script behind an HtmlHelper. I like doing it with the data-* attributes because you can plug different behaviors by just changing the script, and leaving the HTML5 attributes intact. –  danludwig Aug 3 '12 at 18:44

One option is you can load the jquery-ui tabs after the ajax call ends

If you are using jquery to make an ajax call

$.get('..',{},function(){
$("#myTabs").tabs(); //this will load the jquery-ui tabs
});
share|improve this answer
    
This solution would require the View that is making the ajax call to know what initialization is required for the html that is being returned. This breaks encapsulation; the returned html may contain one or more PartialViews each of which requires some initialization. Only the PartialViews know what initialization is required. –  Joe Aug 3 '12 at 17:27

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