Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a string whose size can be as large as "10,000". I have to count those SUBSEQUENCES which are divisible by 9.

SUBSEQUENCE: A subsequence is an arrangement in which the order of characters of given string is maintained. For ex: if given string is 10292 then some of its subsequences are 1, 102, 10, 19, 12, 12(12 is twice as 2 comes twice), 129, 029, 09, 092, etc. Some numbers which are not subsequences of given string are: 201(2 and 0 can't come before 1), 921, 0291, etc.

I have tried to generate all subsequences(powerset) of given string using bit shifting and checking each string if it is divisible by 9. But this works fine as long as length of string is <=10. After that, I don't get proper subsequences(some subsequences are displayed negative numbers).

Below is my code:

    scanf("%s", &str); //input string 

    int n=strlen(str); //find length of string

    //loop to generate subsequences
    for(i=1;i<(1<<n);++i){

        string subseq;

        for(j=0;j<n;++j){

            if(i&(1<<j)){

                subseq+=str[j]; // generate subsequence
            }
        }

        //convert generated subseq to int; number is 'long' tpye
        number=atol(subseq.c_str());printf("%ld\n", number); 

        //ignore 0 and check if number divisible by 9
        if(number!=0&&number%9==0)count++;
    }

        printf("%ld\n", count);
share|improve this question
    
A fun fact that may or may not help you: If a number is divisible by nine, the sum of its digits is also divisible by nine. –  Xavier Holt Aug 3 '12 at 17:33
    
@Xavier: So do you recommend me to find sum of all digits and then check for divisibility?! –  stalin Aug 3 '12 at 17:35
    
As large as "10,000" means as long as 6 characters or 10000 characters? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 3 '12 at 17:37
2  
@XavierHolt: Yeah, I somehow don't think they'd give out a homework problem with a computational intensity of 2^10000. OP: Are you sure they will give you a 10000 digit string? –  Wug Aug 3 '12 at 17:52
1  
codechef.com/AUG12/problems/LUKYDRIV –  jch Aug 3 '12 at 18:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Since a number is divisible by nine if and only if the sum of its digits is divisible by nine, you can get away with this problem with a O(n) recursive algorithm.

The idea is the following: at each step, split in two the subsequence and determine (recursively) how many sequences have the sum of its digits be i % 9, where i ranges from 0 to 8. Then, you build up this very same table for the whole range by "merging" the two tables in O(1) in the following way. Let's say L is the table for the left split and R for the right one and you need to build the table F for the whole range.

Then you have:

for (i = 0; i < 9; i++) {
  F[i] = L[i] + R[i];
  for (j = 0; j < 9; j++) {
    if (j <= i)
      F[i] += L[j] * R[i - j]
    else
      F[i] += L[j] * R[9 + i - j]
  }
}

The base case for a subsequence of only one digit d is obvious: just set F[d % 9] = 1 and all the other entries to zero.

A full C++11 implementation:

#include <iostream>
#include <array>
#include <tuple>
#include <string>

typedef std::array<unsigned int, 9> table;

using std::tuple;
using std::string;

table count(string::iterator beg, string::iterator end)
{
    table F;
    std::fill(F.begin(), F.end(), 0);
    if (beg == end)
        return F;
    if (beg + 1 == end) {
        F[(*beg - '0') % 9] = 1;
        return F;
    }
    size_t distance = std::distance(beg, end);
    string::iterator mid = beg + (distance / 2);
    table L = count(beg, mid);
    table R = count(mid, end);

    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < 9; i++) {
        F[i] = L[i] + R[i];
        for(unsigned int j = 0; j < 9; j++) {
            if (j <= i)
                F[i] += L[j] * R[i - j];
            else
                F[i] += L[j] * R[9 + i - j];
        }
    }
    return F;
}

table count(std::string s)
{
    return count(s.begin(), s.end());
}

int main(void)
{
    using std::cout;
    using std::endl;
    cout << count("1234")[0] << endl;
    cout << count("12349")[0] << endl;
    cout << count("9999")[0] << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't the L and R values in the inner loop be multiplied, not added? –  Xavier Holt Aug 3 '12 at 18:26
    
@XavierHolt: yup, it's the cartesian product (unless in the first case, when we just want to collect the left and right subsequences). Fixed, thanks. –  akappa Aug 3 '12 at 18:29

I had an idea!

Since you only have to count the substrings, you don't care what they actually are. So instead, you can just store counts of their possible sums.

Then, what if you had a function that could combine the count tables of two substring sets, and give you the counts of their combinations?

And since I know that was a horrible explanation, I'll give an example. Say you're given the number:

2493

Split it in half and keep splitting until you get individual digits:

   2493
   /  \
 24    93
 /\    /\
2  4  9  3

What can 2 sum to? Easy: 2. And 4 can only sum to 4. You can build tables of how many substrings sum to each value (mod 9):

   0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
2: 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
4: 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
9: 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3: 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

Combining two tables is easy. Add the first table, the second table, and every combination of the two mod 9 (for the first combination, this is equivalent to 2, 4, and 24; for the second, 9, 3, and 93):

    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
24: 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0
93: 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0

Then do it again:

      0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
2493: 3 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 0

And there's your answer, sitting there in the 0 column: 3. This corresponds to the substrings 243, 2493, and 9. You don't know that, though, 'cause you only stored counts - and fortunately, you don't care!

Once implemented, this'll give you O(n) performance - you'll just have to figure out exactly how to combine the tables in O(1). But hey - homework, right? Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
T(n) = 2T(n/2) + O(1) is O(n): you have n(1 + 1/2 + 1/4 + ... + 1/n) < 2n. –  akappa Aug 3 '12 at 18:36
    
@akappa - Thanks - I knew my math was a little funky... Too much coffee, I'd imagine. Cheers! –  Xavier Holt Aug 3 '12 at 18:45
    
@XavierHolt thnx :)..........! –  stalin Aug 3 '12 at 18:59
    
@XavierHolt When You write Substring did you actually mean Subsequence as Subsequence are different from Subsequence –  Invictus Aug 4 '12 at 10:39
    
Now the real question is how do we limit this to subsequences of length n... –  Dream Lane Aug 4 '12 at 16:12

If you use int then you shouldnt left shift it too much. If you do, you set the sign bit. Use unsigned int. Or dont left shift too much. You can rightshift once you done if you insist on int.

for the

printf("%ld\n", count); 

printf could have problems at displaying long-int types. Did you try cout ?

share|improve this answer
1  
Better yet, store each digit as its own char. It'll take up a lot more space, but it'll make dealing with individual digits - which you're doing a lot - way easier. –  Xavier Holt Aug 3 '12 at 17:36
    
@tugrul: converted to unsigned int, unsigned long.. no effect –  stalin Aug 3 '12 at 17:39
    
@Stalin: printf could have problems at displaying long-int types. Did you try cout ? I had the same problem too but i dont remember how i fixed that. –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Aug 3 '12 at 17:44
    
@tugrul: tried cout.. no effect. I think I must go with Ghost's idea. Keep the subsequences as strings, find sum of digits and check for divisibility by 9. Thnx! Any other ideas are also welcome! –  stalin Aug 3 '12 at 17:51

Here's C++ code according to Akappa's algorithm. However this algorithm fails for numbers that contain one or more 0s i.e. in cases of "10292" and "0189" but gives correct answers for "1292" ans "189". Would appreciate it if anyone could debug this to give answers for all cases.

#include<iostream>
#include<cstdio>
#include<cstdlib>
#include<cmath>
#include<string>
#include<cstring>
#include<vector>
#include<stack>
#include<sstream>
#include<algorithm>
#include<cctype>
#include<list>
#include<set>
#include<set>
#include<map>
using namespace std;
typedef vector<int> table;
table count(string::iterator beg, string::iterator end)
{

    table F(9);
    std::fill(F.begin(), F.end(), 0);
    if (beg == end)
        return F;

    if (beg + 1 == end) {
        F[(*beg - '0') % 9] = 1;
        return F;
    }

    size_t distance = std::distance(beg, end);
    string::iterator mid = beg + (distance / 2);
    table L = count(beg, mid);
    table R = count(mid, end);

    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < 9; i++) {
        F[i] = L[i] + R[i];
        for(unsigned int j = 0; j < 9; j++) {
            if (j <= i)
                F[i] += L[j] * R[i - j];
            else
                F[i] += L[j] * R[9 + i - j];
        }
    }
    return F;
}

table count(std::string s)
{

    return count(s.begin(), s.end());
}

int main()
{


     cout << count("1234")[0] << endl;

    cout << count("12349")[0] << endl;

    cout << count("9999")[0] << endl;

    cout << count("1292")[0] << endl;cout << count("189")[0] << endl;
    cout << count("10292")[0] << endl;cout << count("0189")[0] << endl;
    system("pause");


   }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.