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I have a particular situation where I need to trap exceptions and return an object to the client in place of the exception. I cannot put the exception handling logic at a higher level i.e. wrap Foo with in a try clause.

It's best to demonstrate with some sample code. The exception handling logic is clouding the intention of the method and if I have, many methods of similar intent, in the Foo class, I find myself repeating most of the catch logic.

What would be the best technique to wrap the common exception functionality in the code below?

public class Foo
{
     public Bar SomeMethodThatCanThrowExcepetion()
     {
          try
          {
              return new Bar().Execute();
          }
          catch(BazException ex)
          {
              WriteLogMessage(ex, Bar.ErrorCode);
              return new Bar() { ErrorMessage = ex.Message, ErrorCode = Bar.ErrorCode;}                  
          }
     }

     public Baz SomeMethodThatCanThrowExcepetion(SomeObject stuff)
     {
          try
          {
              return new Baz(stuff).Execute();
          }
          catch(BazException ex)
          {
              WriteLogMessage(ex, Baz.ErrorCode);
              return new Baz() { ErrorMessage = ex.Message, ErrorCode = Baz.ErrorCode;}                  
          }
     }
 } 
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Couldn't you just put your exception handling another level higher and throw an exception up the chain? –  ametren Aug 3 '12 at 17:55
    
Unfortunately, I cannot. I am restricted here. –  fin Aug 3 '12 at 17:57
    
Is there a common base class between Bar and Baz? –  Lee Aug 3 '12 at 17:57
    
Unfortunately not and this is another restriction due to the fact that Foo is a public interface. –  fin Aug 3 '12 at 18:00
    
If you can't move your exception handling to another layer, you're stuck with your implementation. –  Serg Rogovtsev Aug 3 '12 at 18:00
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Updated per Lee's comment


One possibility is to use a generic helper method. Something like this:

T TryExecute<T>(Func<T> action, int ErrorCode)
{
    try
    {
        return action();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        result = Activator.CreateInstance<T>();
        typeof(T).GetProperty("ErrorMessage").SetValue(result, ex.Message, null);
        typeof(T).GetProperty("ErrorCode").SetValue(result, ErrorCode, null);
        return result;
    }
    return result;
}

If you can modify Bar and Baz, then you could improve this by placing a requirement on T:

public interface IError
{
    public string ErrorMessage { get; set; }
    public int ErrorCode { get; set; }
}

T TryExecute<T>(Func<T> action, int ErrorCode) where T : IError
{
    try
    {
        return action();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        result = Activator.CreateInstance<T>();
        result.ErrorMessage = ex.Message;
        result.ErrorCode = ErrorCode;
        return result;
    }
}

Then you'd use:

return TryExecute<Bar>(new Bar().Execute, Bar.ErrorCode);

And:

return TryExecute<Baz>(new Baz(stuff).Execute, Baz.ErrorCode);

That may or may not be an over-abstraction for your particular design; the devil is in the details.

share|improve this answer
    
This returns null if an exception is thrown –  Lee Aug 3 '12 at 18:09
    
@Lee the idea was to set result to the error object as needed, within the catch block. –  McGarnagle Aug 3 '12 at 18:10
    
Well you can't do that without any restriction on T or any way of creating one. –  Lee Aug 3 '12 at 18:11
    
@Lee thanks, great point. I updated my answer, which unfortunately uses reflection and magic strings now, but at least it works. –  McGarnagle Aug 3 '12 at 18:22
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How about a base class:

public class ErrorCapable {
  public string ErrorMessage { set; get; }
  public int ErrorCode { set; get; }

  public static ErrorCapable<T> Oops(Exception exc) where T : ErrorCapable, new() {
    // Code for logging error here
    return new T() { ErrorMessage = exc.Message, ErrorCode = exc.ErrorCode };
  }
}

public class Bar : ErrorCapable {
  //...
}
public class Baz : ErrorCapable {
  //...
}

Then in the catch, just use, for example:

return ErrorCapable.Oops<Bar>(ex);
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Do you really need the explicit logging in every method? Instead of having the exception logic in every method, have one handler in your Main method of the program and handle the exceptions generically.

Also, you don't need to return an arbitrary object from a catch block should you really need the logging there, simply use throw; to let it wander up the stack.

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1  
Seems like the right answer to me, but in the question comments the asker says he is restricted from doing that for some reason. –  ametren Aug 3 '12 at 17:59
    
See comment in question. I am restricted from doing this. Cosider Foo as public interface and I have no control to handle the exception at that level. –  fin Aug 3 '12 at 18:01
1  
Okay, that information wasn't there when I wrote my answer. –  Femaref Aug 3 '12 at 18:31
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I think the best you can do is something like:

public T TryOrDefault<T>(Func<T> act, int errorCode, Func<BazException, T> onError)
{
    try
    {
        return act;
    }
    catch(BazException ex)
    {
        WriteLogMessage(ex, errorCode);
        return onError(ex);
    }
}

then you can write your other methods in terms of it:

public Bar SomeMethodThatCanThrowException()
{
    Bar b = new Bar();
    return ExecOrDefault(() => b.Execute(), Bar.ErrorCode, ex => new Bar { ErrorMessage = ex.Message, ErrorCode = Bar.ErrorCode });
}
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