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I'm writing tests right now and am realizing that they're all pretty similar in the beginning:

@Test
public void testThisMemoryOperation() {
    Assert.assertEquals("Sanity check failed, shouldn't be anything in memory yet.",
            0, memoryManager.getObjectsInMemory());
    /* ... */
}

@Test
public void testThatMemoryOperation() {
    Assert.assertEquals("Sanity check failed, shouldn't be anything in memory yet.",
            0, memoryManager.getObjectsInMemory());
    /* ... */
}

@Test
public void testTheOtherMemoryOperation() {
    Assert.assertEquals("Sanity check failed, shouldn't be anything in memory yet.",
            0, memoryManager.getObjectsInMemory());
    /* ... */
}

This seems needlessly repetitive. I could substitute this code with a simple method call at the beginning of each test to run the sanity check assert, but is there a native JUnit annotation like @Rule which I could use to simply run this test before running certain methods?

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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The closest you have if the the Verifier Rule, which adds a check after statement has been evaluated. It you take a look at the source making a PreconditionRule would be very simple.

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Why not just create a simple method and just call it? Something like:

private void test() {
    Assert.assertEquals("Sanity check failed, shouldn't be anything in memory yet.", 0, memoryManager.getObjectsInMemory());
}
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You don't even have to call it in every test if you use @Before. –  Stefan Birkner Aug 4 '12 at 10:37
    
You shouldn't use @Before if it's a test. –  Cedric Beust Aug 4 '12 at 16:23
    
It does not look like a test thou, but a validation that the environment is sane. @Before or a method would both seam appropriate to me. If it is used in many different tests then a Sanity Check rule might be appropriate but I think whiffs a little. –  mlk Aug 7 '12 at 10:51
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Why not put this method in a base class and extend that class in your tests? It will get run automatically each time (at least with TestNG, but I suppose JUnit support inheritance as well).

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