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I've got a folder with ten files in it which i want to loop through. When I just print out the name of the file my code works fine as below

import os
indir = '/home/des/test'
for root, dirs, filenames in os.walk(indir):
    for f in filenames:
        print(f)

prints:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

But if I try to open the file in the loop I get an IO error

import os
indir = '/home/des/test'
for root, dirs, filenames in os.walk(indir):
    for f in filenames:
        log = open(f, 'r')

Traceback (most recent call last):
File "/home/des/my_python_progs/loop_over_dir.py", line 6, in <module>
log = open(f, 'r')
IOError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: '1'
>>> 

Do I need to pass the full path of the file even inside the loop?

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Are you trying to traverse a directory tree, or are you just interested in the regular files in a specific directory/folder? –  Levon Aug 3 '12 at 18:52

3 Answers 3

If you are just looking for the files in a single directory (ie you are not trying to traverse a directory tree, which it doesn't look like), why not simply use os.listdir():

import os  
for fn in os.listdir('.'):
     if os.path.isfile(fn):
        print (fn)

in place of os.walk(). You can specify a directory path as a parameter for os.listdir(). os.path.isfile() will determine if the given filename is for a file.

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the OP's loop doesn't only print the files in one directory. It prints the files (recursively) in every directory undearneath the input directory as well. –  mgilson Aug 3 '12 at 18:35
    
@mgilson I must be missing that in looking at OP's code (OP only refers to filenames not directories) and part of the question read "folder with ten files in it which i want to loop through." .. did I skip some information? –  Levon Aug 3 '12 at 18:37
    
If the OP has the directory structure :. contains file1,directory1 and directory1 contains file2. the OP's code will print file1,file2 whereas your solution would print file1, directory1. (sorry, this is really hard to explain in comments). –  mgilson Aug 3 '12 at 18:40
    
@mgilson No I trust you, let me look it over and make corrections or delete the answer if it's not appropriate - thanks for the heads up. –  Levon Aug 3 '12 at 18:41
    
@mgilson I adjusted my answer to only deal with regular files. –  Levon Aug 3 '12 at 18:50

Yes, you need the full path.

log = open(os.path.join(root, f), 'r')

Is the quick fix. As the comment pointed out, os.walk decends into subdirs so you do need to use the current directory root rather than indir as the base for the path join.

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3  
os.walk descends into subdirs, so you shouldn't use indir here. Use root. –  Steven Rumbalski Aug 3 '12 at 18:34
    
good catch, updated. –  koblas Aug 3 '12 at 18:36

The examples to os.walk in the documentation show how to do this:

for root, dirs, filenames in os.walk(indir):
    for f in filenames:
        log = open(os.path.join(root, f),'r')

How did you expect the "open" function to know that the string "1" is supposed to mean "/home/des/test/1" (unless "/home/des/test" happens to be your current working directory)?

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