Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm new to SQL, (using SQL 2008 R2) and I am having trouble inserting multiple rows into a single column.

I have a table named Data and this is what I am trying

INSERT INTO Data ( Col1 ) VALUES
('Hello', 'World')

That code was taken from this question, but it, like many other examples I have found on the web uses 2 columns, I just want to use 1. What am I doing wrong?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
@BaliC...Are you wantint to insert "Hello" into one record and then "World" into another record...ord just enter "Hello World" into one record? –  MikeTWebb Aug 3 '12 at 19:16
    
@MikeTWebb The first one, "Hello" into one and "World" into another. –  Bali C Aug 3 '12 at 19:32

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Another way to do this is with union:

INSERT INTO Data ( Col1 ) 
select 'hello'
union 
select 'world'
share|improve this answer

to insert values for a particular column with other columns remain same:-

INSERT INTO `table_name`(col1,col2,col3)
   VALUES (1,'val1',0),(1,'val2',0),(1,'val3',0)
share|improve this answer
    
here...in a single query,col2 has added 3 different values as 3 different records with same values for col1 and col3 in all records –  user1633492 Oct 31 '12 at 14:15
    
+1 for covering how to add multiple specific columns to multiple rows –  sjwarner Oct 31 '12 at 14:35

To insert into only one column, use only one piece of data:

INSERT INTO Data ( Col1 ) VALUES
('Hello World');

Alternatively, to insert multiple records, separate the inserts:

INSERT INTO Data ( Col1 ) VALUES
('Hello'),
('World');
share|improve this answer

I believe this should work for inserting multiple rows:

INSERT INTO Data ( Col1 ) VALUES
('Hello'), ('World'),...
share|improve this answer
  INSERT INTO Data ( Col1 ) VALUES ('Hello'), ('World')
share|improve this answer

If your DBMS supports the notation, you need a separate set of parentheses for each row:

INSERT INTO Data(Col1) VALUES ('Hello'), ('World');

The cross-referenced question shows examples for inserting into two columns.

Alternatively, every SQL DBMS supports the notation using separate statements, one for each row to be inserted:

INSERT INTO Data (Col1) VALUES ('Hello');
INSERT INTO Data (Col1) VALUES ('World');
share|improve this answer
INSERT INTO hr.employees (location_id) VALUE (1000) WHERE first_name LIKE '%D%';

let me know if there is any problem in this statement.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.