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I have the following code. It works great except for a couple issues. First, my "if not blank" check doesn't work at all. Second, during each iteration, the last time it passes the servername as both the servername and folder, which I'm really not understanding...

code

 SET servers=server01,server02
 SET drive=c
 SET root=program files (x86)\test\
 SET backup=%root%\backup 
 SET folders=folder01\,folder02\file01.txt


 FOR %%b in (%servers%) do (
    FOR %%a in (%folders% %%b) DO (
        if not %%a == "" call :backup %%b %%a
    )
 )


:backup
 SET currentfile="\\%1\%drive%$\%2"
 setlocal
 echo Backing Up %currentfile%
 REM mkdir "\\%1\%drive%$\%backup%"
 REM xcopy /I
 exit /b
 endlocal
 goto :end

output

1] Backing Up "\\server01\c$\folder01\"
2] Backing Up "\\server01\c$\folder02\file01.txt"
3] Backing Up "\\server01\c$\server01"
4] Backing Up "\\server02\c$\folder01\"
5] Backing Up "\\server02\c$\folder02\file01.txt"
6] Backing Up "\\server02\c$\server02"
7] Backing Up "\\\c$\"

As you can see, lines 3, 6 and 7 are not desired.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Lines 3 and 6 are caused because of the %%b in the inner for loop. Line 7 is caused because the script does not terminate after the loops, so it runs the :backup code once more at the end.

The following seems to give the desired result:

@echo off

SET servers=server01,server02
SET drive=c
SET root=program files (x86)\test\
SET backup=%root%\backup 
SET folders=folder01\,folder02\file01.txt


FOR %%b in (%servers%) do (
    FOR %%a in (%folders%) DO (
        rem echo a is %%a
        if not %%a == "" call :backup %%b %%a
    )
)

exit /b


:backup
SET currentfile="\\%1\%drive%$\%2"
setlocal
echo Backing Up %currentfile%
REM mkdir "\\%1\%drive%$\%backup%"
REM xcopy /I
endlocal
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1  
+1, I was in the midst of writing virtually the same answer when I saw your post come through. Though I like to use EXIT /B instead of GOTO :EOF –  dbenham Aug 3 '12 at 20:01
    
@dbenham Thanks. I agree that exit is clearer and have made the change. –  Matthew Strawbridge Aug 3 '12 at 20:08
    
@KenWhite I think goto :eof predates exit /b, and expect Raymond Chen has been using it ever since :) –  Matthew Strawbridge Aug 3 '12 at 20:15
    
Maybe. :-) He seems pretty up-to-date with the changes in batch stuff, though, looking at the articles from this week. Wait... You calling me old? :-) –  Ken White Aug 3 '12 at 20:58
    
@KenWhite - There is evidence that GOTO :EOF and EXIT /B are implemented identically, except EXIT /B enables specification of return code. I like using one syntax for all situations, so I adopted EXIT /B as soon it was available. But most "old timers" stick with what they originally learned, and "young pups" learn from the example code provided by the "old timers". So GOTO :EOF maintains its hold on the batch world. Nothing wrong with that :-) –  dbenham Aug 3 '12 at 21:45

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