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I have a call back, that I call back multiple times ( recursively via setTimeOut )...there is only one condition in which I want to capture a return value, that is when the callback is done calling itself back.

However on this condition, when I return something, I don't get it where I expect to, plus I don't know where it goes at all. There are two console.log statements marking these points...in the snippet below. One where I send it...and one where I expect it.

        if( MC.C.movePane( pane_element, 0, 0, 0, 'begin' ) ) {
            cover_element.style.display = 'none';
            console.log('I never got it');
        }
        return o_p;
    },
    movePane: function( pane_element, start, end, index, state ) {
        if( ( state === 'begin' ) ) { // init the function
            start = parseInt( window.getComputedStyle( pane_element, null ).getPropertyValue("top"), 10 );
            end = start + 40;
            index = start;
            state = 'down';
            MC.C.movePane( pane_element, start, end, index, 'down' );
        }
        if( ( state === 'down' ) && ( index < end ) ) { // move down
            index += 1;
            pane_element.style.top = ( index ) + 'px';
            setTimeout( function( ){ MC.C.movePane( pane_element, start, end, index, state ); }, 1 );
        }
        else if( ( state === 'down' ) && index === end ) { // hold
            state = 'up';
            setTimeout( function( ){ MC.C.movePane( pane_element, start, end, index, state ); }, 2000 );
        }
        else if( ( state === 'up' ) && ( index > start ) ) { // move up
            index -= 1;
            pane_element.style.top = ( index ) + 'px';
            setTimeout( function( ){ MC.C.movePane( pane_element, start, end, index, state ); }, 1 );
        }
        else if( ( state === 'up' ) && ( index === start ) ) { // all done, return
            console.log('I just returned true');
            return true;
            // document.getElementById( 'po_but_cov' ).style.display='none';
        }
    }
};
share|improve this question
    
What so you mean by "where it goes"? Return values are available where functions are called. –  Dave Newton Aug 3 '12 at 19:44
    
Function return values are available from where a function is called. That doesn't mean they're available from other places. –  Dave Newton Aug 3 '12 at 20:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you're asking how to recover the return value of movePane() when it's called from setTimeout(), you can't. setTimeout() makes no provisions for capturing and returning a value. But that's OK, because by the time the callback executes, the code that called setTimeout() is no longer running -- yes?

If you want the callback to communicate that it's done doing something then -- hold onto your hat -- you're going to have to give your callback a callback of its very own. When the callback is though doing its time-delayed thing, it can call that callback, which will do whatever the original code would have done if it had gotten the return value.

Sorry if that makes your head hurt, but that's just how it works.

It might look something like (sorry if the parens and braces don't quite match up)

    MC.C.movePane( pane_element, 0, 0, 0, 'begin', function() {
        cover_element.style.display = 'none';
    });
    return o_p;

    // ...
    movePane: function( pane_element, start, end, index, state, myCallback ) {
        // ...
        else if( ( state === 'up' ) && ( index === start ) ) { // all done, return
            console.log('I just returned true');
            // return true;
            myCallback();
share|improve this answer
    
You need to put the two lines cover_element.style.display = 'none'; console.log('I never got it'); in a function, and pass that function to movePane(), and have movePane() call it at the point where you want it to return true. Each time movePane() called itself, it would have to pass that same function along. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Aug 3 '12 at 19:48
    
No. Let the original code just finish, but put the cleanup work in a new function, and pass that function to movePane() to call when it's all done. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Aug 3 '12 at 19:49
    
Here, I will try to add some code to my answer... –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Aug 3 '12 at 19:50
    
I guess. Don't know why you'd want to do it that way. If it's in scope, movePane() could just call it then. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Aug 3 '12 at 19:54
    
Yes, that works. Using a callback would let you be more flexible, but if you don't need that, then don't bother with it. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Aug 3 '12 at 20:08

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