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I have a tree of models and I'd like to have them load from one big JSON request up front and then be able to change them one at a time without saving the whole tree or reloading the whole tree and without making two versions of each model.

The problem I've encountered is if each of the submodels has a keySource they won't upfront load, but without a keySource you can't do an individual load or save.

My content in the upfront load is the entire object tree fully connected (no id lists) because I didn't see a way around this. Is that the problem? Or is what I'm trying to do just not possible without two versions of the models that are somehow connected?

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It is possible to do selective saving if you override the save method of Backbone.Model. I wrote an article on this topic. Your choice if you want to create little sub-models that represent parts of your model. When those are changed, you can get their changedAttributes hash and pass it to the save of the main model. With the method I discuss in the article it is entirely possible to post only parts of your model during a save.

Have you considered using a collection for this? You could override the parse method of collection to create your models. Just a thought.

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Ok, but then you aren't using backbone relational at all are you? You are just loading nested data and handling all the parsing and such yourself. Also the submodels aren't true models if you do that so they can't be independently passed to a view. I guess you could pass the whole tree to each view and then search down the part you want, but that seems wrong. –  mortea Aug 3 '12 at 22:20

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