Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is the original Linq:

       var developersUsingCSharp =
                from d in developers
                    where d.Language == "C#"
                    select d.Name;

This can be written as:

     Func<Developer, bool> filteringPredicate = d => d.Language == "C#";
     Func<Developer, string> selectionPredicate = d => d.Name;
     IEnumerable<string> developersUsingCSharp =
                    developers
                         .Where(filteringPredicate)
                         .Select(selectionPredicate);

Above we have explicitly defined the Func <T,T> delegates. So in

     Func<Developer, bool> filteringPredicate = d => d.Language == "C#";

it is known that d is of Developer type and return type is bool. Similarly, for

     Func<Developer, string> selectionPredicate = d => d.Name;

it is know that d is of Developer type and the return type is string. However in following valid form of the same query how are these types inferred:

IEnumerable<string> developersUsingCSharp =
                      developers
                         .Where(d => d.Language == "C#")
                         .Select(d => d.Name);
share|improve this question
    
Referring to your last code block, that query is not yet inferred. It is still deferred by default unless you call the greedy methods like ToList(), ToArray(). –  lll Aug 3 '12 at 20:40
2  
@LeoLuis: He means type inference rather than fetching the data. These notions are not related. –  Wiktor Zychla Aug 3 '12 at 20:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The compiler knows that the elements in developers are Developers, so it can infer the first type argument of both lambdas. The compiler can infer the second type arguments by examining the return values of the lambdas: bool for the Where, and string for the Select.

share|improve this answer
    
So it does that at runtime?!?. Can it "examine" the types at runtime? Sure? Is it type safe then? –  Mahesha999 Aug 3 '12 at 20:55
1  
No, the compiler does it. It is done at compile time. It is type safe. –  Dan Aug 3 '12 at 20:59
    
It does infering in compile time. So it absolutely type safe –  Kirill Bestemyanov Aug 3 '12 at 21:01
    
Thanks no book specifies that explicitly, though they explain the code. –  Mahesha999 Aug 3 '12 at 21:02

The compiler knows developers implements IEnumerable<Developer>. This implies that any IEnumerabler<T> extensions off of developers will have items of type Developer.

share|improve this answer
    
ok so type of d can be inferred, but then what of return types? bool and string? –  Mahesha999 Aug 3 '12 at 20:53

I don't really see a question there; but, have a look at section 7.5.2 of the C# spec. I contains subsections that describe how anonymous and generic method resolution and type inference is performed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.