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public class Operations {

    private int add;
    private int sub;
    private int mul;
    private int div;
    private double sqrt;

    public void setadd(int a, int b) {
        add = a + b;
    }

    public void setsub(int a, int b) {
        sub = a - b;
    }

    public void setmul(int a, int b) {
        mul = a * b;
    }

    public void setdiv(int a, int b) {
        div = a / b;
    }

    public void setsqrt(double sqt) {
        sqrt = Math.sqrt(sqt);
    }

    public int getadd() {
        return add;
    }

    public int getsub() {
        return sub;
    }

    public int getmul() {
        return mul;
    }

    public int getdiv() {
        return div;
    }

    public double getsqrt() {
        return sqrt;
    }

}

Do I have to do a prototype of this or in Java that's not necessary, also how do I use static methods here instead of setter and getter.. I'm trying to do a calculator.. Are my methods ok?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Make all the operations (addition, multiplication, division, etc ) static methods of a Calculator class:

   class Calculator{

     public static int add(int a, int b){
           return a+b;
     }
     ...
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I don't really understand the point of setting and getting, why not have your calculator like this:

public class Calculator {
public int add(int a, int b){
    return a + b;
}
public int sub(int a , int b){
    return a - b;
}
public int mul(int a, int b){
    return a * b;
}
public int div(int a, int b){
    return a/b;
}
public double sqrt(double sqt){
    return Math.sqrt(sqt);
}
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Might also be worth making these static; you don't really need an instance of a Calculator object to do the operations. –  Dennis Meng Aug 3 '12 at 21:14
    
i undersTAND THAT IM JUST DOING PRACTICE HERE THAT'S ALL JUST LEARNING AND EXPERIMENTING –  user1535963 Aug 3 '12 at 21:18
    
The methods really should be static - they do not operate on any instance field. –  Andreas_D Aug 3 '12 at 21:19
    
I don't think that the methods should be static. First of all, the whole class does make no sense, because it just executes basic operations. But what if the class becomes more responsibilities? What if you want to subclass it? What if you have to mock it in a unit test? Then you would have a problem with static methods. Recomending static methods to a Java newbie is no good idea. If you want to learn thinking in an object oriented way, it's better to avoid static methods. –  Apfelsaft Aug 3 '12 at 22:02

Your methods are all wrong, because you modeled your operation incorrectly. It is not supposed to contain its result, and it should do only one operation, not all of them. Operation object should be immutable, and it should produce an answer to a specific operation given two operands. You should separate binary operations from unary as well.

interface BinaryOp {
    double calculate(double left, double right);
}
interface UnaryOp {
    double calculate(double operand);
}
private static final BinaryOp ADD = new BinaryOp() {
    double calculate(double left, double right) {
        return left + right;
    }
};
private static final BinaryOp SUB = new BinaryOp() {
    double calculate(double left, double right) {
        return left - right;
    }
};
private static final BinaryOp MUL = new BinaryOp() {
    double calculate(double left, double right) {
        return left * right;
    }
};
private static final BinaryOp DIV = new BinaryOp() {
    double calculate(double left, double right) {
        return left / right;
    }
};
private static final UnaryOp SQRT = new UnaryOp() {
    double calculate(double operand) {
        return Math.sqrt(operand);
    }
};

Now you can organize your operators by name:

private static final Map<String,BinaryOp> opByName = new HashMap<String,BinaryOp>();
static {
    opByName.put("+", ADD);
    opByName.put("-", SUB);
    opByName.put("*", MUL);
    opByName.put("/", DIV);
}

With this map, you can use your operations to perform calculations for you:

String op = "+";
double left = 123;
double right = 456;
double res = opByName.get(op).calculate(left, right);
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Just to answer the part of the question not answered yet:

You do not need prototypes in java.

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This looks like a good use for an enum or two:

enum BinOp {
    ADD {
        @Override
        public int eval(int leftArg, int rightArg) {
            return leftArg + rightArg;
        }
        @Override
        public String symbol() {
            return "+";
        }
    },
    SUBTRACT {
        @Override
        public int eval(int leftArg, int rightArg) {
            return leftArg - rightArg;
        }
        @Override
        public String symbol() {
            return "-";
        }
    }
    // etc.
    ;
    public abstract int eval(int leftArg, int rightArg);
    public abstract String symbol();
}

And a similar enum for unary operators (only SQRT, at the moment).

You could use these as follows:

int left = 3;
int right = 2;
for (BinOp op : BinOp.values()) {
    System.out.println("The value of "
        + left + " " + op.symbol() + " " + right " is "
        + op.eval(left, right)
    );
}
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