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I use the following code to obtain the date of its own file:

var lastmod = 
($("body").append(ifr=$("<iframe src=\"this.js\">")),
ifr[0].contentWindow.document.lastModified)
|| "???";

In Chrome it returns the correct date. In firefox it returns the equivilent of timestamp 0 (1970). Is this a case of it not being a standard use of javascript? Or more a case of the file being locked in one browser and not the other as a case of undefined behaviour? Is there a better way to obtain the last modified date of the file that doesn't involve server-side code?

UPDATE: Actually, turns out Chrome isn't displaying it correctly either--Chrome is displaying the current time (not account for +1 summertime), Firefox displays 01/01/1970 00:00:00

share|improve this question
    
what is ifr ? – Madbreaks Aug 3 '12 at 22:06
    
I made a mistake of leaving a comment in the code without the comment operator being there. I've deleted it out. The value of ifr is irrelevent since it is overwritten. – Rob F Aug 3 '12 at 22:07
1  
It was not irrelevant in your original code - you were accessing it without declaring it. And no, ifr is not "overwritten". – Madbreaks Aug 3 '12 at 22:07
    
Actually, turns out Chrome isn't displaying it correctly either--Chrome is displaying the current time (not account for +1 summertime), Firefox displays 01/01/1970 00:00:00 – Rob F Aug 3 '12 at 22:09
    
This isn't the entire code, it is a quotation of the relevent code. You can take the declaration as implicit. ifr is used as an lvalue before an assignment operator-- I call that overwritten. – Rob F Aug 3 '12 at 22:10

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