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I would like to sort and binary search a static array of strings via the String.CompareTo comparator.

The problem is that both sorting, and binary searching requires that a Comparator object be passed in -- So how do I pass in the built in string comparator?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The Arrays class has versions of sort() and binarySearch() which don't require a Comparator. For example, you can use the version of Arrays.sort() which just takes an array of objects.

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@GeorgesOatesLarsen Ahh, so long as you're aware ;) (which obviously I'm not :P) –  MadProgrammer Aug 4 '12 at 0:23
1  
Your StringComparator class should implement Comparator<String>. Otherwise it can't be passed in to the search or sort methods ;) –  theisenp May 14 '13 at 20:40
    
@theisenp Thanks for the catch. For future reference, you can always edit questions and answers with such improvements (if you don't already know). –  Code-Apprentice May 15 '13 at 1:37
    
Answer does not use Comparator object and will only sort strings in standard order. Using a Comparator would look like Arrays.sort(array, String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER) for example. –  wcochran Oct 4 '14 at 0:05
    
@wcochran Notice that this question explicitly requires the built in string comparator. –  Code-Apprentice Oct 4 '14 at 0:44

You may write your own comparator

public class ExampleComparator  implements Comparator<String> {
  public int compare(String obj1, String obj2) {
    if (obj1 == obj2) {
        return 0;
    }
    if (obj1 == null) {
        return -1;
    }
    if (obj2 == null) {
        return 1;
    }
    return obj1.compareTo(obj2);
  }
}
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+1 for the implements Comparator –  Georges Oates Larsen Aug 4 '12 at 0:11
8  
Comparator is a generic type, so ExampleComparator should probably implement Comparator<String> to avoid warnings. –  theisenp May 14 '13 at 20:41
    
For string comparator, keep in mind to lowercase (or uppercase) string before compare them otherwise you should get this order A-Za-z –  Andrea Girardi Feb 19 '14 at 12:00
    
Need to implement equals() too. –  wcochran Oct 3 '14 at 23:57

If you do find yourslef needing a Comparator, and you already use Guava, you can use Ordering.natural().

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To answer the actual question:

package util;

import java.util.Comparator;

/**
 * The Default Comparator for classes implementing Comparable.
 *
 * @param <E> the type of the comparable objects.
 *
 * @author Michael Belivanakis (michael.gr)
 */
public final class DefaultComparator<E extends Comparable<E>> implements Comparator<E>
{
    @SuppressWarnings( "rawtypes" )
    private static final DefaultComparator<?> INSTANCE = new DefaultComparator();

    /**
     * Get an instance of DefaultComparator for any type of Comparable.
     *
     * @param <T> the type of Comparable of interest.
     *
     * @return an instance of DefaultComparator for comparing instances of the requested type.
     */
    public static <T extends Comparable<T>> Comparator<T> getInstance()
    {
        @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
        Comparator<T> result = (Comparator<T>)INSTANCE;
        return result;
    }

    private DefaultComparator()
    {
    }

    @Override
    public int compare( E o1, E o2 )
    {
        if( o1 == o2 )
            return 0;
        if( o1 == null )
            return 1;
        if( o2 == null )
            return -1;
        return o1.compareTo( o2 );
    }
}

How to use:

Comparator<String> stringComparator = DefaultComparator.getInstance();
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Also, if you want case-insensitive comparison, in recent versions of Java the String class contains a public static final field called CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER which is of type Comparator<String>, as I just recently found out. So, you can get your job done using String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER.

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This is the right answer. –  tallseth Mar 20 at 20:31
    
@tallseth this is the right answer only if you are interested in case-insensitive search, and you are using a recent version of java. If what you need is case-sensitive search, or if you are stuck with some old version of java, then this is not the right answer for you. –  Mike Nakis Jul 15 at 11:45

Again, don't need the comparator for Arrays.binarySearch(Object[] a, Object key) so long as the types of objects are comparable, but with lambda expressions this is now way easier.

Simply replace the comparator with the method reference: String::compareTo

E.g.:

Arrays.binarySearch(someStringArray, "The String to find.", String::compareTo);

You could also use

Arrays.binarySearch(someStringArray, "The String to find.", (a,b) -> a.compareTo(b));

but even before lambdas, there were always anonymous classes:

Arrays.binarySearch(
                someStringArray,
                "The String to find.",
                new Comparator<String>() {
                    @Override
                    public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
                        return o1.compareTo(o2);
                    }
                });
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We can use the String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER comparator to compare the strings in case insensitive order.

Arrays.binarySearch(someStringArray, "The String to find.",String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER);
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