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Have an interesting problem and am looking for the right solution. We have around 100,000 PDF documents of varying sizes, with the average size being 150 pages. It is currently on a RAID6 server and is backed up off-site as well. There is a total of 6.5TB worth of PDFs we need to index.

We are currently converting the PDFs into text files and storing them in a similar folder structure on the server. These will then need to be indexed and made searchable including back links to the original folder. The text files use the same name as the PDF with an additional naming convention added onto them. If my estimates are correct, this puts it close to 4 billion words that will need to be indexed.

What would be a suitable solution for indexing these files?

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A google search appliance? –  Marc B Aug 4 '12 at 0:46

4 Answers 4

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I would take a look at SOLR. We are currently looking into using it as a full-text search engine for documents. It's widely used and well supported.

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I have looked into Solr but was unsure if it could scale to this level.. Are server is about 3 years old that uses 2 two-core 5130 Xeons with 24gb of ram. Would this be capable of handling this giant index? –  Sam D Aug 4 '12 at 1:40
    
I'm not sure. I believe SOLR is geared more towards horizontal scalability at this point (wiki.apache.org/solr/SolrCloud). With that amount of data, and as it grows, you might want to consider scaling out with commodity hardware. –  Justin Swartsel Aug 4 '12 at 12:26
    
The data might grow by 10% a year but not much more than that. I think SOLR will be the way to go due to the zookeeper distributed search. Thanks –  Sam D Aug 4 '12 at 19:48

Check out the Google Search Appliance. Why reinvent the wheel?

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Most of the google search appliances either have a document limit on them or are outside are budget for this project. –  Sam D Aug 4 '12 at 1:41

That comes out to like 400K a page if I am doing my my math right. That is a big page size.

What do you need to use the index for?

If you need proximity and phrase then needs to index them all and a product like SOLR. Through TIKI I think you can index PDF.

Another option is to use SQL full text. But you would need to build a front end app. Where SOLR is and app and and engine.

Do you need to index every word or just the unique words? If only need a basic search then there are only about 200,000 unique words in the English language. If you stem them with like the porter stemmer that number will come down. Then throw out stop words like "the". Then you need to and proper names email and other words not in the dictionary. I index documents manually and even a very large collection tops out at 300,000 (if it is real words - ocr will kill that number). If a document has 2,000 unique words the cross index is only 20,0000,000. You can parse out the words using REGEX. I know it seems ugly but I do this manually in SQL and .NET. No proximity or phrase search but it has a small footprint and is fast. (SQL Azure does not have full text)

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They are some rather big files that contain many technical pictures included on them. The total document count is higher than 100k but the average page size is apx 220k which is still rather big. It wont need to use any text from the images. We will need to index all of the text including words like "the" because they are often used in titles for the PDF's. I'm thinking SOLR is the way to go at this point. Anything problems we will run into with the amount of data were indexing? –  Sam D Aug 4 '12 at 19:30

If there's no compelling reason to use a SQL database for this, I'd consider a specialized search engine.

Most full-text search software can read PDF files without requiring you to convert them to text files. I've used dtSearch successfully in the past.

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Dt search is very good but it crash's frequently due to the number of files involved. –  Sam D Aug 4 '12 at 19:43

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