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I'm trying to do some simple work with the text/template package. The sample given at the top of template is what I'm working with.

How do I write the 'parsed' file so template.ParseFiles() properly reads and executes it?

package main

import (
    "text/template"
    "os"
)

type Inventory struct {
    Material string
    Count    uint
}

func main() {
    sweaters := Inventory{"wool", 17}
    tmpl, err := template.New("test").Parse("{{.Count}} items are made of {{.Material}}")
    // tmpl, err := template.New("test").ParseFiles("file.txt")

    if err != nil { panic(err) }
    err = tmpl.Execute(os.Stdout, sweaters)
    if err != nil { panic(err) }
}

/*
Contents of file.txt:
{{.Count}} items are made of {{.Material}}

Error thrown:
panic: template: test:1: "test" is an incomplete or empty template

goroutine 1 [running]:
main.main()
    /tmp/templates/t.go:19 +0x21a

goroutine 2 [syscall]:
created by runtime.main
    /var/tmp/portage/dev-lang/go-1.0.1/work/go/src/pkg/runtime/proc.c:221
*/

I have a copy of this code posted at the golang playground here

Edit #1: I've been doing some research on this issue... since it's the Execute() method that actually throws the exception, and not the ParseFiles() part, I checked the method definition:

// Execute applies a parsed template to the specified data object,
// and writes the output to wr.
func (t *Template) Execute(wr io.Writer, data interface{}) (err error) {
    defer errRecover(&err)
    value := reflect.ValueOf(data)
    state := &state{
        tmpl: t,
        wr:   wr,
        line: 1,
        vars: []variable{{"$", value}},
    }
    if t.Tree == nil || t.Root == nil {
        state.errorf("%q is an incomplete or empty template", t.name)
    }
    state.walk(value, t.Root)
    return
}

So, on a hunch, I dumped the value of t.Tree for the inline 'non-file' style, tmpl is: &parse.Tree{Name:"test", Root:(*parse.ListNode)(0xf840030700), funcs:[]map[string]interface {}(nil), lex:(*parse.lexer)(nil), token:[2]parse.item{parse.item{typ:6, val:""}, parse.item{typ:9, val:"{{"}}, peekCount:1, vars:[]string(nil)} and when ran with ParseFiles(), tmpl is: (*parse.Tree)(nil). I find it odd that one is a dereference, and one value is a pointer. This may help solve the riddle

share|improve this question
1  
Note, the interesting thing about this example, and other ParseFiles() tests I've done, they don't fail on parsing, they fail when they get to the Execute() phase, always with the incomplete or empty template message – Evan Plumlee Aug 4 '12 at 3:03
    
Your linked golang playground example works for me. Are you sure this is actually broken? – Jeremy Wall Aug 4 '12 at 3:17
    
Yes, it works fine, because you don't have access to a filesystem on the playground. However, if you uncomment the ParseFiles() line, comment out the other Parse() line run it locally, you'll see the error that I have in the comments in the code. – Evan Plumlee Aug 4 '12 at 3:26
up vote 6 down vote accepted
sweaters := Inventory{"wool", 17}
tmpl, err := template.ParseFiles("file.txt")
if err != nil {
    panic(err)
}
err = tmpl.ExecuteTemplate(os.Stdout, "file.txt", sweaters)
if err != nil {
    panic(err)
}

If you have many files, you can use ParseGlob:

tmpl, err := template.ParseGlob("*.txt")
if err != nil {
    panic(err)
}
err = tmpl.ExecuteTemplate(os.Stdout, "file.txt", sweaters)
if err != nil {
    panic(err)
}
err = tmpl.ExecuteTemplate(os.Stdout, "file2.txt", sweaters)
if err != nil {
    panic(err)
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Yup, I actually found that answer myself later on, but stackoverflow would not let me post it. It is confusing and unfortunate that while Parse() works in a similar fashion to (t *Template) Parse(), ParseFiles() works in a different way than (t *Template) ParseFiles() which caused all of my confusion. Thanks for answering. – Evan Plumlee Aug 4 '12 at 13:19
1  
Key point: use template.ParseFiles("filename.txt"), NOT (t *Template) ParseFiles... and I will never get the last hour back again. – mblackwell8 Feb 27 '14 at 6:58
    
@EvanPlumlee: Ran into the same issue and your comment is what cleared it up for me. Don't think I would have found it otherwise. Had to look at the pkg docs again. – Pat K Jan 10 '15 at 8:51

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