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I have written a Perl Script using WWW::Mechanize which reads URLs from a text file and connects to them one by one. In each operation, it parses the content of the webpage looking for some specific keywords and if found, it will be written to the output file.

To speed up the process, I used Parallel::ForkManager with MAX_CHILDREN set to 3. Though I have observed an increase in the speed, the problem is that, after a while the script crashes. Perl.exe process gets killed and it does not display any specific error message.

I have run the script multiple times to see if it always fails at the same point, however the point of failure seems to be intermittent.

Please note that I have already taken care of any memory leaks in WWW::Mechanize and HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath as follows:

  1. For WWW::Mechanize, I set stack_depth(0) so that it does not cache the history of visited pages.
  2. HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath, I delete the root node once I am done with it. This approach helped me in resolving a memory leak issue in another similar script which does not use fork.

Here is the structure of the script, I have mentioned only the relevant parts here, please let me know if more details are required to troubleshoot:

#! /usr/bin/perl

use HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath;
use WWW::Mechanize;
use warnings;
use diagnostics;
use constant MAX_CHILDREN => 3;

open(INPUT,"<",$input) || die("Couldn't read from the file, $input with error: $!\n");
open(OUTPUT, ">>", $output) || die("Couldn't open the file, $output with error: $!\n");

$pm = Parallel::ForkManager->new(MAX_CHILDREN);

$mech=WWW::Mechanize->new();
$mech->stack_depth(0);

while(<INPUT>)
{
chomp $_;
$url=$_;

$pm->start() and next;

$mech->get($url);

if($mech->success)
{
    $tree=HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath->new();
    $tree->parse($mech->content);

    # do some processing here on the content and print the results to OUTPUT file

    # once done then delete the root node

    $tree->delete();
}

$pm->finish();

print "Child Processing finished\n"; # it never reaches this point!

}

$pm->wait_all_children; 

I would like to know, why does this Perl script keep failing after a while? For understanding purpose, I added a print statement right after the finish method of fork manager, however it does not print that. I have also used, wait_all_children method, since as per the document of the module on CPAN, it will wait for the processing to get over for all the children of the parent process.

I have not understood why, wait_all_children method is place outside the while or the for loop though (as observed in the documentation as well), since all the processing is taking place inside the loop.

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

As for why this code is written with a main job loop with the start and finish calls and then followed by a wait_all_children outside the loop. It works like this:

  1. The parent process gets the next job from <INPUT> at the start of each loop.
  2. The parent runs start, which causes the child process to fork. At this point, you have 2 processes, each of which is running the exact same code at the exact same point. 3a. The parent process hits that or next and jumps back to the top to read the next <INPUT> and start the process over. 3b. The child process does not hit the or next and continues running the code you give until it hits finish, where the child exits.
  3. Meanwhile the parent process is busy going through the loop and creating a child each time through. After forking 3 children (or whatever you set the limit to) it blocks until one of the children exit. At which point, it immediately spawns a new child (resulting in step 3b for each child each time).
  4. When the parent runs out of jobs, it jumps out the while loop (never having run anything in it itself) and then waits for all the remaining children to exit.

As you can see, any code in the loop after finish is called is never going to run in either the parent (because it doesn't do anything after or next within the loop) or the children (because they exit at finish).

I've never used Parallel::ForkManager, but it looks like you can put a run_on_finished hook to run some code at the finish if you want to put a print statement there at the end.

To find the problem, though, I'd suggest wrapping all the code between start and finish in an eval or use Try::Tiny and warn out the error to see if there's an exception happening in there that's breaking it. I'd expect such things to show up in STDERR when the child dies, though, so I'm not really sure that will help.

However, it's worth shot. Here's my suggestion in code, just showing the part I'd catch exceptions from:

# At the top add
use Try::Tiny;

# Later in your main loop

$pm->start() and next;

try {

    $mech->get($url);

    if($mech->success)
    {
        $tree=HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath->new();
        $tree->parse($mech->content);

        # do some processing here on the content and print the results to OUTPUT file

        # once done then delete the root node

        $tree->delete();
    }
}

catch {
    warn "Bad Stuff: ", $_;
};

$pm->finish();

That might help show you what's gone wrong.

If it does not help, you might try moving the try block to include more of the program (like nearly all of it after the use Try::Tiny line) and see if that elucidates anything.

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Hi, thanks for your help. I tried placing the try and catch blocks to see more details of the error message, however it does not work. I even tried including more code inside this, but this would make the script fail even earlier without giving any error message details. –  Neon Flash Aug 4 '12 at 3:11
    
The try blocks are just an attempt to reveal the problem. Without being able to see what # do some processing here is doing, it's difficult to help much more than that. The forking here makes some of the debugging tedious. You could add a bunch of warn statements like warn "[$$] After mech get\n" and warn "[$$] After tree delete\n" to get a sense of where it's failing. The $$ will let you group the warning log entries by child process ID. –  zostay Aug 4 '12 at 11:31
    
Is it ok for you, if I send you the script in private message? –  Neon Flash Aug 5 '12 at 13:08

The $pm->wait_all_children; function call waits for "ALL" the child processes to end and places a Blocking lock. I am not sure what kind of error handling you have done for $mech inside the if() statement, but you may want to re-visit that.

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I thought there will be only one parent process at any point of time and it will spawn at max, 3 childs. When any one child finishes the work, a new child process is spawned. I have tried with and without, wait_all_children method. For the error handling of $mech, I have placed, $mech->get($url) inside eval and then check for $@ to see if it is empty or not. If not, then display an error message and proceed. –  Neon Flash Aug 4 '12 at 3:37

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