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I would like to know how to initialize an array in a class whose values can be used in constant-expressions. Here is an explanation of my problem :

// The goal : initializing an array for a class
// whose values can be used as normal static const
// (as template parameters for example)

class MyClass
{
    public:
        static const unsigned int value = 42; // <- No problem here
        static const unsigned int array[3] = {100, 101, 102}; // <- How to initialize this static const array (with constexpr or metaprogrammation maybe ?)
        template<unsigned int T> inline void f() {std::cout<<"Hello, my value is "<<T<<std::endl;} // <- Simple function for demonstration purposes
        inline void fvalue() {f<value>();} // <- No problem here
        inline void farray() {f<array[1]>();} // <- Big problem here
};
//const unsigned int Class1::array[3] = {100, 101, 102}; // <- If I do this, I will initialize the array but farray() will not compile

Is there any way to do this in C++ 2011 ? (with constexpr or metaprogrammation maybe ?)

Thank you very much !

EDIT : As the title specify it, I need the array to be a member of the class (not a global array).

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Is this what you need? To be honest, I'm not 100% sure what's going on with that case of initialization, but it seems to work fine for the template. –  chris Aug 4 '12 at 2:25
    
This is just an example case. I need to have a array whose values can be used in constant-expressions for some CRTP, loop unrolling and optimizations purposes. But if we find the solution for this case, I will be able to use the same technique on my problem. –  Vincent Aug 4 '12 at 2:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, you can make it constexpr..

Making it constexpr allows the static member to have more types than just integral or enumeration types, when it is initialized in-class. In particular, the member just needs to be of a literal type, and all expressions in the initializer must be constant expressions. So this is fine

class MyClass
{
    public:
        static constexpr unsigned int array[3] = {100, 101, 102};
        template<unsigned int T> inline void f() {
            std::cout<<"Hello, my value is "<<T<<std::endl;
        } // <- Simple function for demonstration purposes
        inline void farray() {f<array[1]>();}
};

// needs a definition out-of-class too. put it into a .cc file
constexpr unsigned int MyClass::array[3];
share|improve this answer
    
What version of gcc are you using (if you're using that)? gcc 4.5.1 throws a bunch of compiler errors for me: ideone.com/Gm5hA –  Jason Aug 4 '12 at 3:36
1  
@Jason GCC4.5 did not yet sufficiently implement the constexpr proposals. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Aug 4 '12 at 3:39

Just in case you were wondering what a meta-programming example could look like, here's an example:

#include <iostream>

template<size_t... values>
struct number_list;

template<size_t value, size_t... values>
struct number_list<value, values...>
{
    static const size_t val = value;
    typedef number_list<values...> next;
};

template<size_t index, typename NumList>
struct indexer
{
    static const size_t val = indexer<index - 1, typename NumList::next>::val;
};

template<typename NumList>
struct indexer<0, NumList>
{
    static const size_t val = NumList::val;
};

template<typename NumList>
class MyClass
{
    public:
        template<size_t T> inline void f() 
        {
            std::cout << "Hello, my value is " << T << std::endl;
        }

        inline void farray() {f<indexer<1, NumList>::val>();}
};

int main()
{
        MyClass<number_list<3, 5, 6>> a;
        a.farray();
        return 0;
}
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