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So I have this javascript/Backbone script that looks something like this:

var Model = Backbone.Model.extend({});

var View = Backbone.View.extend({

 initialize: function() {
    _.bindAll(this); //bind this
   this.doProcessing();
 },

 doProcessing: function() {

  $('.someElement').each(function() {
      Model myModel = new Model;
      myModel.fetch({                          //issue ajax
         success: function(model, response){   //after successful ajax
            console.log(this)                  // <-- outputs Window!!
       });     

   }); //end each

  } //end processing

});

new View;

What escapes me is how does this get bound to the Window. I'm well aware of my closures but shouldn't this refer to the model?

Here's what I understand - the success call back is somehow bound to the Window Object. Thus when it's invoked the context is that of the window object. But it's a bit unexpected behaviour in my opinion. Any reason why backbone does it (or am I misunderstanding something?).

It's a bit weird to set the myModel's properties via the model parameter of success. It seems quite convoluted to call model.set({...}) when it should allow for a simple this.set({...})

Is my understanding of this correct in this case? Any workarounds? Or is this more of of the way XHR binds to success callbacks?

From Backbone's source (Model.fetch):

fetch: function(options) {
      options = options ? _.clone(options) : {}; //cloning options - does this variable get bound to global?
      var model = this;
      var success = options.success;            //or is it this?
      options.success = function(resp, status, xhr) {
        if (!model.set(model.parse(resp, xhr), options)) return false;
        if (success) success(model, resp);
      };
      options.error = Backbone.wrapError(options.error, model, options);
      return (this.sync || Backbone.sync).call(this, 'read', this, options);
    },
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

"the success call back is somehow bound to the Window Object"

No, functions in JavaScript are not "bound". What this is is only specified at the time the function is called. Let's see how it is called

success(model, resp)

So the function is called directly, not through a method call syntax (someObj.someMethod(...)), nor through .call() or .apply(). So in this case, this is set to the global object, which in this case is the window.

share|improve this answer

One work around would be to try something like this

myModel.fetch({                          
     success: _.bind(function(model, response){   
        console.log(this);                  
   },this);
});     
share|improve this answer
    
doesn't seem to work. The output is the div element on which each is iterating, but not myModel –  PhD Aug 4 '12 at 4:22
    
works if you change this to myModel as the last parameter to bind. But isn't this a bit ugly? –  PhD Aug 4 '12 at 4:24

This happens by default since .call() or .apply() hasn't given any specific context and it falls back to using window as the this object

share|improve this answer
    
where do you see that? The call to call includes this as the context if I understand correctly –  PhD Aug 4 '12 at 6:25
    
there is no call being done... your success handler is just being called regularly: if (success) success(model, resp); –  c4urself Aug 4 '12 at 16:28

The context of a block, or what this is making reference to is very volatile in javascript.

I think the change of context is done in the block $('.someElement').each(function() { ... });, and nothing related to how the Model.fetch() works.

Try to add more log like:

doProcessing: function() {
  console.log( "out of the block", this );

  $('.someElement').each(function() {
    console.log( "begining of block", this );

    Model myModel = new Model;
    myModel.fetch({                          
      success: function(model, response){ 
        console.log( "into the fetch", this );                 
      }     
    });
  };

  console.log( "end of block", this );
}

Into the each block this should be the actual DOM element into the loop.

To solve this change of this meaning a workaround that I'm used to use, and that I'm used to see around is referencing this to another variable out of the block (when this is what you expect to be) and use this new reference into the block:

doProcessing: function() {
  console.log( "out of the block", this );

  var _self = this;

  $('.someElement').each(function() {
    console.log( "begining of block", _self );

    Model myModel = new Model;
    myModel.fetch({                          
      success: function(model, response){ 
        console.log( "into the fetch", _self );
      }     
    });
  };

  console.log( "end of block", this );
}

Update

If what you want is make reference to your recent created Model just use the external reference you have created like this:

doProcessing: function() {
  $('.someElement').each(function() {
    Model myModel = new Model;
    myModel.fetch({                          
      success: function(model, response){ 
        console.log( "into the fetch", myModel );                 
      }     
    });
  };
}

Or just use the reference that Backbone is sending to the success callback:

doProcessing: function() {
  $('.someElement').each(function() {
    Model myModel = new Model;
    myModel.fetch({                          
      success: function(model, response){ 
        console.log( "into the fetch", model );                 
      }     
    });
  };
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I do use that. But that is not the point. _self refers to the outermost object and not to myModel –  PhD Aug 4 '12 at 18:11
    
@PhD Answer updated to show you how to pass a reference to the recent created Model –  fguillen Aug 4 '12 at 19:15

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