Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
float4 color = tex2D(inputSampler, TexCoord);
     //compute distance from center
float distance = color.a>0.3f?length(TexCoord - 0.5f):1.0f;

What is color.a&gt and why is there a ; in the middle of that second line?

share|improve this question
1  
you shouldnt completely change the question after an accept. you should start a new question. You should revert your original version and start a new question. –  Preet Kukreti Aug 4 '12 at 7:13
    
I've fixed it. The new question was basically: "How do I use this HLSL code to shade things?" -- which I agree should be its own question. –  Andrew Russell Aug 4 '12 at 7:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Response to the original question: "Can someone tell me what this snippet of HLSL code means?

float4 color = tex2D(inputSampler, TexCoord);
  //compute distance from center 
float distance = color.a>0.3f?length(TexCoord - 0.5f):1.0f;

what is color.a&gt and why is there a ; in the middle of that second line?"


Its a html escape sequence screwup. > should be > ("greater than" symbol).

So it should be:

float4 color = tex2D(inputSampler, TexCoord);
     //compute distance from center
float distance = color.a > 0.3f?length(TexCoord - 0.5f):1.0f;

Likewise if you encounter &lt; it is probably < ("less than" symbol). Other common ones ones are:

  • &quot; -> '"'
  • &amp; -> '&'
  • &nbsp; -> ' ' (space)

What the pixel shader is actually doing is if the alpha of the sampled texture at this point is greater than 0.3, distance is the length from the sampled texcoord (U,V) location to (0.5, 0.5) i.e. the center of the texture sampled from. If the alpha is 0.3 or less, then distance is set to 1.0f.

The distance value is obviously used later in the shader to apply some pixel effect.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.