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I have a variable that represents the XOR of 2 numbers. For example: int xor = 7 ^ 2;
I am looking into a code that according to comments finds the rightmost bit that is set in XOR:

int rightBitSet = xor & ~(xor - 1);

I can't follow how exactly does this piece of code work. I mean in the case of 7^2 it will indeed set rightBitSet to 0001 (in binary) i.e. 1. (indeed the rightmost bit set)
But if the xor is 7^3 then the rightBitSet is being set to 0100 i.e 4 which is also the same value as xor (and is not the rightmost bit set).
The logic of the code is to find a number that represents a different bit between the numbers that make up xor and although the comments indicate that it finds the right most bit set, it seems to me that the code finds a bit pattern with 1 differing bit in any place.
Am I correct? I am not sure also how the code works. It seems that there is some relationship between a number X and the number X-1 in its binary representation?
What is this relationship?

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but 7^2 inverts the second to reightmost bit. doesnt touch other bits. 7 is 111 2 is 010 so we have 101 as result –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Aug 4 '12 at 8:27
    
Not related to my question.I am not asking what a xor is –  Cratylus Aug 4 '12 at 8:32
    
it is subtraction –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Aug 4 '12 at 8:33
    
7^2 is 5 7^3 is 4 7^4 is 3 –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Aug 4 '12 at 8:33
    
and you may have guessed 7^7 subtracts 7 from 7 which result 0 –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Aug 4 '12 at 8:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The effect of subtracting 1 from a binary number is to replace the least significant 1 in it with a 0, and set all the less significant bits to 1. For example:

5 - 1 = 101 - 1 = 100 = 4
4 - 1 = 100 - 1 = 011 = 3
6 - 1 = 110 - 1 = 101 = 5

So in evaluating x & ~(x - 1): above x's least significant 1, ~(x - 1) has the same set bits as ~x, so above x's least significant 1, x & ~(x-1) has no 1 bits. By definition, x has a 1 bit at its least significant 1, and as we saw above ~(x - 1) will, too, but ~(x - 1) will have 0s below that point. Therefore, x & ~(x - 1) will have only one 1 bit, at the least significant bit of x.

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+1 for the first part.I did not understand the second paragraph at all.above x's least significant 1, x & ~(x-1) has no 1 bits. Why? –  Cratylus Aug 4 '12 at 8:52
    
Rephrase: the only effect of subtracting 1 from a binary number is to replace the least significant 1 in it with a 0. So x - 1 has the same bits as x, above the ls1 of x, so x & ~(x - 1) is all 0s above x's ls1. –  Louis Wasserman Aug 4 '12 at 9:00
    
I think I got it. So essentially we get a representation that is the least significant bit set (above and bellow bits are clear) that the numbers making up the xor defer?So the comments actually mean he least significant bit? –  Cratylus Aug 4 '12 at 9:04
    
Just curious.How do you remember these stuff?Do you write code manipulating bits often?I am asking because I am always interested in what other do in case it can help me improve –  Cratylus Aug 4 '12 at 9:08
    
"Do you write code manipulating bits often?" Yes. –  Louis Wasserman Aug 4 '12 at 9:44

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