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Possible Duplicate:
Does JavaScript have a range() equivalent?

Is there a way to declare a range in Javascript/jQuery like we do in Python?

Something like this:

x = range(1,10)

x = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]

Thanks.

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marked as duplicate by Felix Kling, Trevor, Daniel A. White, Anthony Mills, pimvdb Aug 4 '12 at 13:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
For fun try: function r(start,end){ start = start || 1; return end >= start ? r(start,end-1).concat(end) : []; } – KooiInc Aug 4 '12 at 14:00
up vote 3 down vote accepted

By using some third party libraries like Underscore.js you can achieve the same behaviour as in Python http://underscorejs.org/#range

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Thanks, that is what I was looking for. – Memochipan Aug 4 '12 at 20:37

You simply can create an array, loop over the values using a for loop and pushing the values. There isn't anything built into the language.

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Put this function in your Javascript code, and you should be able to call range() like you do in Python (but it only works for numbers):

function range(start, end)
{
    var array = new Array();
    for(var i = start; i < end; i++)
    {
        array.push(i);
    }
    return array;
}
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Just interesting, how may [1..10] be implemented? =) – ted Aug 4 '12 at 13:48
    
You mean for (var i = start; i < end; i++) – 0x499602D2 Aug 4 '12 at 13:48
    
Definitely useful, but not exactly like range in Python.. docs.python.org/library/functions.html#range :-) – thebjorn Aug 4 '12 at 13:48
    
@David Thanks for the catch – Alex W Aug 4 '12 at 13:49

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