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Why doesn't getchar() wait for me to press enter?

I continue to learn C, and at this stage I have something that is not clear to me. When I write a program, that has several printf();, at the end, where I ask a user to press Enter key to finish the program, I have to write getchar(); twice, because when I write it once it does not work. I use getchar(); only at the end of the program, nowhere else.

I work on Ubuntu. I write in C.

here is my latest work:

#include<stdio.h>
main()
{
int m,n,r,k,q,l;
printf("This program will help you to find GCD & LCM of 2 non-negative integers\n");
printf("Now, you'll be asked to enter your integers, press Enter to continue");
getchar();
printf("Enter first integer:");
scanf("%i", &m);
printf("Enter second integer:");
scanf("%i", &n);
while(m<0 || n<0)
{
printf("The integers cannot be negative! You'll be asked to enter integers again.\n");
printf("Enter first integer:");
scanf("%i", &m);
printf("Enter second integer:");
scanf("%i", &n);
}
while(m==0 && n==0)
{
printf("Both of the integers cannot be zero at the same time! You'll be asked to enter integers again.\n");
printf("Enter first integer:");
scanf("%i", &m);
printf("Enter second integer:");
scanf("%i", &n);
}
if(n>m)
{
int b;
b=n;
n=m;
m=b;
}
r=m%n;
if(r==0)
{
printf("The GCD of these integers is %i\n", n);
printf("The LCM of these integers is %i\n", m);
printf("Press Enter to finish");
getchar();
getchar();
return 0;
}
k=n%r;
while(k>0)
{
r=k;
k=q;
}
l=(m*n)/r;
printf("The GCD of these integers is %i\n", r);
printf("The LCM of these integers is %i\n", l);
printf("Press Enter to finish");
getchar();
getchar();
return 0;
}
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marked as duplicate by Mat, Linuxios, Jonathan Grynspan, Daniel Fischer, DCoder Aug 5 '12 at 7:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
"Also, I have another question" -- then have it in another question. –  user529758 Aug 4 '12 at 14:12
    
Post some code. –  GarlicFries Aug 4 '12 at 14:12
1  
No. Replace your scanf("%d", ...) calls with the pair fgets(buffer, sizeof buffer, stdin); sscanf(buffer, "%d", ...);. Don't forget to define buffer before using it, for example: char buffer[1000]; –  pmg Aug 4 '12 at 14:22
2  
Oh! don't use fflush on input streams: that operation (fflush on input streams) is undefined in the C89 Standard (many C implementations today are still C89). –  pmg Aug 4 '12 at 14:25
1  
fgets needs to know how much space it can use (to avoid buffer overflows). That's why it is passed the size of the buffer (it automatically takes into account the string terminator). –  pmg Aug 4 '12 at 14:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The reason you need 2 getchar() is because

  1. the last scanf() call left the ENTER waiting in the buffer
  2. the 1st getchar() "ate" that ENTER
  3. the 2nd getchar() waits for input.

To properly deal with user input, use fgets() and sscanf() instaed of the simpler scanf(). Define a buffer for these functions, for example

char buffer[1000];

and then replace your scanf() calls with the pair

fgets(buffer, sizeof buffer, stdin);
sscanf(buffer, "%d", &n);

In the future you might want to also check the return value of sscanf() to detect invalid inputs, like foo42ENTER

if (sscanf(buffer, "%d", &n) != 1) /* invalid input */;

Edit (using strtol() rather than sscanf() is even better -- thanks to @Scooter)

char buffer[1000];
char *err;
/* ... */
fgets(buffer, sizeof buffer, stdin); /* error checking ommited */
n = strtol(buffer, &err, 10);
/* error checking ommited */
/* ... */
share|improve this answer
1  
atoi() and strtol() can also be used to get a C string into an int. –  Scooter Aug 4 '12 at 14:52
    
atoi() is not a good choice because there is no way to detect errors. strtol() is even better than sscanf(), thanks! –  pmg Aug 4 '12 at 14:55
    
+1 for discouraging scanf(). C books should start using fgets()+sscanf() instead of scanf(). unbuffered IO is always dangerous –  Aftnix Aug 4 '12 at 15:15

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