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After creating a struct like this:

type Foo struct {
   name string        

}
func (f Foo) SetName(name string){
    f.name=name
}

func (f Foo) GetName string (){
   return f.name
}

How do I create a new instance of Foo and set and get the name? I tried the following:

p:=new(Foo)
p.SetName("Abc")
name:=p.GetName()
fmt.Println(name)

Nothing gets printed, because name is empty. So how do i set and get a field inside a stuct?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Commentary (and working) example:

package main

import "fmt"

type Foo struct {
    name string
}

// SetName receives a pointer to Foo so it can modify it.
func (f *Foo) SetName(name string) {
    f.name = name
}

// Name receives a copy of Foo since it doesn't need to modify it.
func (f Foo) Name() string {
    return f.name
}

func main() {
    // Notice the Foo{}. The new(Foo) was just a syntactic sugar for &Foo{}
    // and we don't need a pointer to the Foo, so I replaced it.
    // Not relevant to the problem, though.
    p := Foo{}
    p.SetName("Abc")
    name := p.Name()
    fmt.Println(name)
}

Test it and take A Tour of Go to learn more about methods and pointers, and the basics of Go at all.

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11  
Name() would be the idiomatic name for the getter (see golang.org/doc/effective_go.html#Getters) –  Anonymous Aug 5 '12 at 10:16
1  
This should be the accepted answer! –  Sergio A. Mar 4 at 23:22
    
@Anonymous You're right, I edited the answer. –  Zippoxer Mar 5 at 16:06
    
How expensive is the getter if it requires a copy? Does it actually copy the entire struct? –  Kugel Aug 21 at 0:02

Setters and getters are not that idiomatic to Go. Especially the getter for a field x is not named GetX but just X. See http://golang.org/doc/effective_go.html#Getters

If the setter does not provide special logic, e.g. validation logic, there is nothing wrong with exporting the field and neither providing a setter nor a getter method. (This just feels wrong for someone with a Java background. But it is not.)

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4  
Part of the reason for information hiding (encapsulation) is program evolution. You simply don't splutter your code everywhere with direct access. Lets say after 1 year, you do decide to implement validation or something even a little bit different. You don't want to refactor a thousand different places but just a single file and a single place. Throwing out established practices and thought from other languages isn't ALWAYS the right thing to do. –  sat May 26 at 21:02

For example,

package main

import "fmt"

type Foo struct {
    name string
}

func (f *Foo) SetName(name string) {
    f.name = name
}

func (f *Foo) GetName() string {
    return f.name
}

func main() {
    p := new(Foo)
    p.SetName("Abc")
    name := p.GetName()
    fmt.Println(name)
}

Output:

Abc
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While technically your answer will work, GetFoo() is not the idiomatic getter naming for Foo in Go : it should be just Foo(). More details in Zippoxer's answer. –  FGM Jul 13 at 20:30

This brings me another question : in the method :

func (f *Foo) SetName(name string) {
    f.name = name
}

I don't understand because f is a pointer on an element of type Foo. So, how can you access to the attribute name using directly the pointer ? I now it compiles and run, but I don't understand why. Shouldn't it be

func (f *Foo) SetName(name string) {
    (*f).name = name
}

Is this just some syntactic sugar or did I miss something ?

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3  
Yes, it is syntactic sugar. If you access an attribute of a pointer, Go automatically dereferences it. golang.org/ref/spec#Selectors –  justinas Dec 16 '13 at 15:08
    
This is excellent sugar. If I had reason to not automatically dereference my pointers 99.99% of the time, I'd be coding in C instead of Go. –  Josh from Qaribou Jul 4 at 23:25

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