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I have started playing around with immutable value objects in Java while working on a game project, following the "public final fields" approach:

public class Team {
    public final String name, flag;

    public Team(String name, String flag) {
        this.name = name;
        this.flag = flag;
    }
}

This works pretty well for me so far, but I need different sets of extra information about the team in different circumstances. For example, a team has a set color during a match. The question is, what is the best way to deal with these sets of extended information? I know this is a fairly general question, but I want to keep using immutable objects and that might influence the solution.

Here are the options I have come up with. Most of them are probably "good enough", but I'd like to learn some arguments for and against them for future reference.

Option 1: Everything in one class

public class Team {
    public final String name, flag, colorName;
    public final int colorRgb;

    public Team(String name, String flag, String colorName, int colorRgb) {
        this.name = name;
        this.flag = flag;
        this.colorName = colorName;
        this.colorRgb = colorRgb;
    }
}

This takes only one class for all uses, but there is no type-based indication of what extra data is expected/provided.

Option 2: Subclassing

public class TeamWithColor extends Team {
    public final String colorName;
    public final int colorRgb;

    public Team(String name, String flag, String colorName, int colorRgb) {
        super(name, flag);
        this.colorName = colorName;
        this.colorRgb = colorRgb;
    }
}

This might make a content-based equals() implementation impossible.

Option 3: Composition

public class TeamWithColor {
    public final Team team;
    public final String colorName;
    public final int colorRgb;

    public Team(Team team, String colorName, int colorRgb) {
        this.team = team;
        this.colorName = colorName;
        this.colorRgb = colorRgb;
    }
}

Less copying / boilerplate code if the team data and extra data often change independently.

Option 4: Pair/Tuple (using an immutable Pair class)

public class TeamColor {
    public final String colorName;
    public final int colorRgb;

    public Team(String colorName, int colorRgb) {
        this.colorName = colorName;
        this.colorRgb = colorRgb;
    }
}

Pair<Team, TeamColor> teamWithColor = Pair.create(team, teamColor);

... or with a custom class that ties Team and TeamColor together.

I tend toward option 3 or 4, but I'm interested in your opinions, arguments and gut feelings :)

share|improve this question
1  
Or use interfaces (e.g. ITeam, ITeamColor) .. the constructors can't be unified anyway. –  user166390 Aug 4 '12 at 17:02
2  
If all your teams have a color, then it should all be in one class. –  Strelok Aug 4 '12 at 17:15
    
It's not really an answer, but I would say that you should let the client (the code that's using Team objects and colors) drive the interface design. That is, write the client first, just stubbing out the model. Then use what you learned to refine the model and finish its implementation. –  erickson Aug 4 '12 at 18:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As you said. The team can appear in different circumstances. These circumstances are the context giving the team the additional attributes.

Therefore I suggest using composition for each different context that add's data.

public class TeamWithColor {
    public final Team team;
    public final TeamColor teamColor;

    public Team(Team team, TeamColor teamColor) {
        this.team = team;
        this.teamColor = teamColor;
    }
}

Maybe you'll have :

public class TeamDuringOlimpics{
    public final Team team;
    public final TeamColor teamColor;
    public final TeamFlag teamFlag;

    public Team(Team team, TeamColor teamColor, TeamFlag teamFlagTeamFlag teamFlag) {
        this.team = team;
        this.teamColor = teamColor;
        this.teamFlag = teamFlag;
    }    
}
share|improve this answer

Composition sounds like a good option for adding contextual data that is required to be mutable.

In Java immutable classes are usually marked final and cannot be extended. See String as an example. That rules out option number 2.

Be weary of using Pairs. There are many good reasons the Pair type has not been added to Java. In this case your data is better modeled by creating a new data type (i.e. thru composition).

Recommended best practices for creating immutable classes: http://www.javapractices.com/topic/TopicAction.do?Id=29

share|improve this answer
    
Good point, if you advertise a class as immutable it is probably a good idea to ensure there can't be mutable subclasses, even though in this case the only things that could behave unexpectedly are methods from Object. But I am asking a pedantic question, so I deserve pedantic answers :P –  Medo42 Aug 4 '12 at 17:31

You could consider keeping this piece of information outside the Team object. For instance, you could have a Map or Map

This way, you could enrich your objects with many additional values without introducing new classes or modifying existing classes. Moreover, it would keep the immutable property of the other objects.

share|improve this answer

If an immutable class is inheritable, or if contains aspects whose types could be mutable, then it will have no security against mischief. A "immutable" interface will likewise have no security. Likewise also if an object has any members of extensible types, and object is regarded as containing any of the information in the objects referred to by those members. It is up to you to decide whether or not that is a problem. Immutable interfaces and extensible mutable classes may be much more versatile than deeply-sealed ones; if a class isn't going to be deeply sealed, there's little security advantage to making it partially so.

Note that it is possible for a deeply-immutable object to have a field which is of a mutable type, if the semantics of the field specify that it identifies, rather than contains, the object in question. For example, it may be useful to have have a "snapshot" object which contains references to some mutable objects and, for each object, an immutable copy of its current state; the "snapshot" object would then expose a method of restoring each object to the state it had when the snapshot was generated. The snapshot object would be "deeply immutable" despite its reference to a mutable object, since the snapshot's references to the mutable objects exist purely to identify them, and the identities of those objects wouldn't change even if their state does.

One pattern that I like in .net, which should also work in Java, is to have interfaces like IReadableFoo and IImmutableFoo; the latter would inherit the former but not add any new members. The interface IReadableFoo should contain, in addition to members to read its properties, a member AsImmutable() which would return an IImmutableFoo. This approach allows code to use mutable types when convenient, while minimizing redundant defensive copying (code which wants to persist something must call AsImmutable() on it; if the object in question is mutable, that action will create an immutable copy, but if the object is already immutable, no new copy will be required).

share|improve this answer

I recommend the Decorator pattern.

public class TeamWithColor extends Team {
    public final Team team;
    public final String colorName;
    public final int colorRgb;

    public Team(Team team, String colorName, int colorRgb) {
        this.team = team;
        this.colorName = colorName;
        this.colorRgb = colorRgb;
    }
}

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decorator_pattern

share|improve this answer
    
This is not a decorator - for that, Team would have to be an interface. If we switch to using getters and interfaces, the decorator would probably combine advantages of composition (less copying) with those of inheritance (can use TeamWithColor everywhere Team can be used). On the downside, you have to put delegating getters in TeamWithColor, so you can't add fields to Team without also editing TeamWithColor. Also, it would require more code (two interfaces, two classes, lots of getters). –  Medo42 Aug 7 '12 at 7:41

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