Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to test any method which accesses a winform control? The following method accesses the Enabled property in a series of controls on my form. Unfortunately i have no idea how to unit test this/if its even possible.

Id really appreciate some pointers.

    public void AccessToCsvFileVerificationInputs(bool access)
    {
        btnSelectCSVFilePath.Enabled = access;
        nudNumberOfColumns.Enabled = access;
        cbCurrencyPair.Enabled = access;

        foreach (Control input in tlpColumnDataTypes.Controls)
        {
            input.Enabled = access;
        }

        foreach (Control input in tlpColumnNames.Controls)
        {
            input.Enabled = access;
        }

        nudInitialRow.Enabled = access;
        nudFinalRow.Enabled = access;

        btnSelectErrorLogFilePath.Enabled = access;
    }
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I've found the best approach to this to be shifting the design of your application into some form of Model-View-* pattern, where for Winforms Model-View-Presenter 1 is usually a good fit.

This way you have a presenter/controller class which is responsible for all the logic and you have the view which holds the UI code. In Winforms you usually achieve this be having your form class implement an IView interface that defines everything it can do.

You then provide the form (passing it in declared as the interface) to the presenter - with constructor Dependency Injection being the typical way of passing it in.


So in your example you move your AccessToCsvFileVerificationInputs method into the presenter class and pass the presenter an instance of a form that implements the correct interface, saying everything that that form can do.

Something like this:

public class CsvFilePresenter
{
    private ICsvFileView view_;
    public CsvFilePresenter(ICsvFileView view)
    {
        view_ = view;
    }

    public void AccessToCsvFileVerificationInputs(bool access)
    {
        // Code omitted for brevity
    }
}

Now in that method everywhere where you referenced UI features like controls directly you instead reference the interface:

public void AccessToCsvFileVerificationInputs(bool access)
{
    view_.EnableSelectCSVFilePath = access;
    view_.EnableNumberOfColumns = access;
    view_.EnableCurrencyPair = access;

    // And so on...
}

I intentionally left the control collections out - how you deal with those will depend on specifics.

So for example you have this ICsvFileView interface:

public interface ICsvFileView 
{
    bool EnableSelectCSVFilePath { get; set; }
    bool EnableNumberOfColumns { get; set; }
    bool EnableCurrencyPair { get; set; }        
}

A concrete implementation of this ICsvFileView might look like this:

public partial class Form3 : Form, ICsvFileView
{
    public Form3()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    bool ICsvFileView.EnableSelectCSVFilePath
    {
        get
        {
            return btnSelectCsvFilePath.Enabled;
        }
        set
        {
            btnSelectCsvFilePath.Enabled = value;
        }
    }

    bool ICsvFileView.EnableNumberOfColumns
    {
        get
        {
            return nudNumberOfColumns.Enabled;
        }
        set
        {
            nudNumberOfColumns.Enabled = value;
        }
    }

    bool ICsvFileView.EnableCurrencyPair
    {
        get
        {
            return cbCurrencyPair.Enabled;
        }
        set
        {
            cbCurrencyPair.Enabled = value;
        }
    }
}

Now that you have done this you can test the behaviour of your logic (as expressed by the presenter) and its interaction with the View by passing in a mocked instance of the interface and setting expectations on that mock.


Do note that if all this seems a little complicated and convoluted it is because it is! Winforms was not really designed with this sort of thing in mind - other frameworks such as WPF were and make all this much easier. If you can change, I'd recommend considering it.


1 Martin Fowler on the webpage I linked to has retired this pattern, moving it into two more distinct patterns - I'll keep the terminology though since it is well known. His new Passive View is close to how I've always seen MVP.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi David, Thanks for takin the time to reply to my question. Ive had a read through ur answer a couple times n i think i understand it now. Im going to go and give it a shot and see how i get on. Ive marked this as the answer n +1 in the mean time. Thanks again for your time! –  Hans Rudel Aug 4 '12 at 17:52
    
@HansRudel No problem at all. If after trying this, if anything doesn't make sense just leave a comment and I'll try to clarify. There are also several example projects around where people build a Winforms MVP framework - google Winforms and MVP (or MVC) and you should find some. –  David Hall Aug 4 '12 at 17:54
    
morning, im still having some issues understanding how this works. I have a basic understanding of how the MainForm partial class implements an interface (IMainView) which specifies all the events (button clicks etc) and properties etc that MainForm needs to implement. Instance of MainForm is then passed into MainPresenter via DI. What i dont understand though is how can i access a controls properties in the MainPresenter class? Im only declaring the methods in the IMainForm interface so how can i access a controls properties? (sorry if this is a stupid question). –  Hans Rudel Aug 6 '12 at 8:33
1  
@HansRudel I've added an example showing the Enables properties of controls. It comes down to design after that - you need to decide how to structure your views, what properties the expose etc. Again, all this is a little tough with Winforms where you can't easily assign controllers to user controls. –  David Hall Aug 6 '12 at 12:01
    
any chance i could have a couple minutes of your time in a chatroom tonight? –  Hans Rudel Aug 6 '12 at 16:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.