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I know this is done all the time, but for some reason, it's not making one bit of sense to me. [Insert @#$%! here] I don't know what the proper OOP procedure is for this (assumingly) obvious solution. I've briefly read up on Abstract and Interface type classes, with no avail to any examples that do what I'm asking.

So here's the setup...

In this example, I have two classes, one that I am going to call from my script, and another two that I could either call from my script or from within the first class that I called. The psuedo-code:

<?php

    // Some code here

    $timer = new timer();
    $doSomethingCool = new doSomethingCool();

    $doSomethingCool->doIt();
    print $timer->length();



    class timer {
        private $startTime;
        private $stopTime;
        private $length;

        public function start() {
            // Start running the timer
        }
        public function end() {
            // End the timer
        }
        public function length() {
            // Return the length of the timer
            return $this->length;
        }
    }

    class doSomethingCool {
        public function doIt() {

            $timer->start();

            // Some code here

            $timer->end();

        }
    }

?>

I have been able to get this to "run" (see below), but this work-around is messy, and I am 100% sure this isn't proper object oriented modeling:

<?php
    // Start by declaring all classes and pass all classes to themselves...

    $doSomethingCool = new doSomethingCool();
    $timer = new timer();
    $class = array(
        'doSomethingCool'=>$doSomethingCool,
        'timer'=>$timer
    );

    $doSomethingCool->class = $class;
    $timer->class = $class;


    // Some code here
    $class['doSomethingCool']->doIt();
    print $timer->length();



    class timer {
        // In each class we now declare a public variable
        // 'class' that we had passed all class instances to...
        public $class;

        private $startTime;
        private $stopTime;
        private $length;

        public function start() {
            // Start running the timer
        }
        public function end() {
            // End the timer
        }
        public function length() {
            // Return the length of the timer
            return $this->length;
        }
    }

    class doSomethingCool {
        public $class;

        public function doIt() {

            $this->class['timer']->start();

            // Some code here

            $this->class['timer']->end();

        }
    }

?>

Due to E_STRICT, I do not want to use $timer::start();.

So what's the solution, ladies and gentlemen? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
I don't understand the question. What exactly are you trying to accomplish with this? (English is easier to read than code sometimes :)) –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Aug 4 '12 at 17:30
    
Your pseudo code has a global variable $timer which you are trying to use as a local variable. Either create the $timer locally or use global $timer;. –  Vatev Aug 4 '12 at 17:31
    
@minitech, ha, I hear you...so basically, I want to be able to call one class function from another separate class function. –  J-Law Aug 4 '12 at 17:31
    
@Vatev, let me make sure I didn't mess up my psuedo... Edit: you're right, I could do that if I wanted to. Still, that doesn't seem like proper coding to me. –  J-Law Aug 4 '12 at 17:31
1  
When you say assumingly, do you mean presumably? –  TRiG Aug 4 '12 at 17:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you want to inject other classes into some class. If so:

class Database {}
class Timer {}

class Foo
{
    protected $database;
    protected $timer;

    public function __construct(Database $database, Timer $timer)
    {
         $this->database = $database;
         $this->timer = $timer;
    }

    public function doSomething()
    {
        $this->timer->start();
    }

}

$database = new Database();
$timer = new Timer();
$foo = new Foo($database, $timer);

Note that you should add your real classes of course (where I have used Database and Timer).

share|improve this answer

The polymorphic way:

class SomeClass {
    protected $db;
    function __construct(Database $database) {
        $this->db = $database;
    }
    function doIt() {
        // . . .
    }
}

class TimedSomeClass extends SomeClass {
    protected $timer;
    function __construct(Database $db, Timer $timer) {
        $this->timer = $timer;
        parent::__construct($db);
    }

    function doIt() {
        $this->timer->start();
        parent::doIt();
        $this->timer->stop();
    }
}

Polymorphism might not be the best tool for this situation, but it sounds like you want to do it polymorphically in your question, so here it is.

share|improve this answer

If you want an object a of class A to access an object b of class B then you must pass it to a if b is not global in some sense. In you case you could do this:

  • by adding it to the constructor new doSomethingCool($timer) or
  • by creating and using a set method and to store the object handle as a private property, eg. $doSomethingCool->setTimer( $timer ); or
  • by passing as a parameter in doIt()

Another alternative is to use a singleton template for the timer class -- which essentially makes the timer a glbal object, but such templates are now generally deprecated.

share|improve this answer
    
@J-Law or you could just pass a timer instance to doIt() if you'd rather do that. –  JMM Aug 4 '12 at 17:50
    
@JMM, you are correct you could just pass it to the doIt method, but my point here is that either the timer is global (yuk) or you have to pass it. I'll clarify my answer. –  TerryE Aug 4 '12 at 17:53
    
yup, agreed, was just building on your answer for OP's sake. Since they didn't understand that in the first place I don't assume they'll be able to connect the dots from your answer to realize that they can pass it to doIt(). –  JMM Aug 4 '12 at 17:56
    
I would just drop that singleton crap for the sake of a good answer ;-) –  PeeHaa Aug 4 '12 at 17:57
    
@JMM, the biggest problem with the way you're thinking is that I have to have a separate instance of the same class...doesn't work very well when I want to share variables. –  J-Law Aug 4 '12 at 18:00

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