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I can seem to only read file into memory if I explicitly declare the buffer size. This works

#include <stdio.h>
int main(){
  FILE *fp = fopen("test.log", "rb");
  char buffer[37];
  fread(buffer, 1, 36, fp);
  printf("%s", buffer);
}

This will add junk to the output

#include <stdio.h>
int main(){
  FILE *fp = fopen("test.log", "rb");
  fseek(fp, 0, SEEK_END);
  long siz = ftell(fp);
  rewind(fp);
  char buffer[siz + 1];
  fread(buffer, 1, siz, fp);
  printf("%s", buffer);
}
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1  
Conceptually wrong. In C, any declaration of array should indicate the size at COMPILE time. If you want to create an array dynamically, use malloc –  texasbruce Aug 4 '12 at 17:43
    
You open the file in binary mode, but print it as a string. This only works if the data is really text. Also, you do not terminate the buffer. Remember that when creating an array it's not automatically zeroed out. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 4 '12 at 17:47
3  
@IanMallett Why not? Variable length arrays are standard well over 10 years. –  Daniel Fischer Aug 4 '12 at 17:51
3  
@texasbruce, IanMallett Please see Variable Length Arrays (VLA) –  Marlon Aug 4 '12 at 17:52
4  
@texasbruce While declaring a VLA the size of a file is questionable, since the file can easily be too large for your stack, I see no problems with VLAs in principle, they're mighty fine when you know the size is not too large. –  Daniel Fischer Aug 4 '12 at 17:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

insert buffer[siz]='\0'; before printf("%s", buffer);

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The terminating of the array should really be done in both cases. The OP is just lucky that the first version worked. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 5 '12 at 6:48
    
@JoachimPileborg : I think so too. –  BLUEPIXY Aug 5 '12 at 8:19
    
There may also the compiler rather than luck. –  BLUEPIXY Aug 5 '12 at 9:12

Try a different approach - use a "memory map". What it does is it allows you to access the file as if it was a memory block. This can dramatically improve performance while simplifying your code at the same time.

Read more about it at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mmap

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't answer the question asked, and there's no indication that a memory-mapped file is needed here. The question specifically asked how to "read a file into memory", which is not what your answer does. There's a difference between "reading a file into memory and "treating a file like it's in memory"." –  Ken White Aug 4 '12 at 17:53

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