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I don't find the help page for the replace function from the base package to be very helpful. Worst part, it has no examples which could help understand how it works.

Could you please explain how to use it? An example or two would be great.

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it's just (not really) shorthand for [x] <- I don't think I've ever used it. –  Tyler Rinker Aug 4 '12 at 19:02
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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

If you look at the function (by typing it's name at the console) you will see that it is just a simple functionalized version of the [<- function which is described at ?"[". [ is a rather basic function to R so you would be well-advised to look at that page for further details. Especially important is learning that the index argument (the second argument in replace can be logical, numeric or character classed values. Recycling will occur when called for by the differing lengths of the second and third arguments:

> replace( 1:20, 10:15, 1:2)
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  1  2  1  2  1  2 16 17 18 19 20

Character indexing for a named vector:

> replace(c(a=1, b=2, c=3, d=4), "b", 10)
 a  b  c  d 
 1 10  3  4 

Logical indexing:

> replace(x <- c(a=1, b=2, c=3, d=4), x>2, 10)
 a  b  c  d 
 1  2 10 10 
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Here's two simple examples

> x <- letters[1:4]
> replace(x, 3, 'Z') #replacing 'c' by 'Z'
[1] "a" "b" "Z" "d"
> 
> y <- 1:10
> replace(y, c(4,5), c(20,30)) # replacing 4th and 5th elements by 20 and 30
 [1]  1  2  3 20 30  6  7  8  9 10
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You can also use logical tests

x <- data.frame(a = c(0,1,2,NA), b = c(0,NA,1,2), c = c(NA, 0, 1, 2)) 
x
x$a <- replace(x$a, is.na(x$a), 0)
x
x$b <- replace(x$b, x$b==2, 333)
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