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According to SUN:

An Error is a subclass of Throwable that indicates serious problems that a reasonable application should not try to catch

I don't agree with this recomendation since there are errors that could be caught and the application could continue (I don't mean let the thread that threw the Error live.That thread is left dead; the rest application lives). Such an Error is OutOfMemory.
Taking this as correct (if you think I am wrong here I would be happy to here the arguments) I was wondering if you try to implement some kind of monitoring code inside applications.
To give a concrete example: I am thinking of putting a small class inside an existing application that detects various errors from logs (example would be OOM) and creates some kind of health statistics so as to restart the JVM if things go bad.
For example if too many OutOfMemoryErrors are detected then restart the JVM. And too many could be some kind of threshold. To be honest I have no idea how I would calculate this threshold. Perhaps something similar with other Errors.
I was wondering is such a mechanism useful? Have you done similar things? If yes do you have any advice or example code? Or am I in the wrong path and should be thinking this some other way?

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closed as not constructive by Hovercraft Full Of Eels, Michael Easter, Burkhard, ig0774, Graviton Aug 10 '12 at 7:14

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How would you fix an OOME? – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Aug 4 '12 at 18:54
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I don't think it's as simple / well-defined as that .. I've always considered OOM errors as fatal. – user166390 Aug 4 '12 at 19:00
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I'd like to see your code where you've recovered successfully from this. In my reading, garbage collection should already have maxed out before this occurs, and in fact according to the OOME API, "Thrown when the Java Virtual Machine cannot allocate an object because it is out of memory, and no more memory could be made available by the garbage collector." Which explicitly states that all possible garbage collection has been done. I think that this is a non-issue, that generic exceptions should not be caught. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Aug 4 '12 at 19:01
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@HovercraftFullOfEels But that garbage collection was done while the thread (a GC root object) that is attempting to allocate more memory is still alive. If the thread dies because of the OOME that results from the memory allocation failure, there is likely to be new garbage (all of the stuff that was strongly referenced only by objects on that thread's stack). The OOM condition doesn't damage any allocated memory. – erickson Aug 4 '12 at 19:09
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@HovercraftFullOfEels:My understanding of this is that a specific allocation request can not be honored. Not that the memory is not enough to function.To give an extreme example imagine that the max heap size is set t 1.5GB.And the heap used is 1.2 GB. Then some specific thread requests 500MB e.g. for some huge tree in-memory representation. This request can not be honored and an OOM occurs. But there are still 300MB available for the application to function. So game is not over yet. Unless you get a constand OOM flow of errors – Cratylus Aug 4 '12 at 19:11

Usually once you hit OutOfMemory you're pretty much screwed - the JVM (this may be slightly inaccurate, from memory) will not throw this until it's already run a full GC and is unable to free sufficient memory.

Closest thing I can think of to what you're looking for would be to output GC activity with -XX:printGC and -XX:printGCdetails and trigger a reset from an outside script.

However if your application is regularly running out of memory it's probably indicative of a problem you should fix.

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Please see last my comment to @HovercraftFullOfEels – Cratylus Aug 4 '12 at 19:13
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All an OOME means is that a request for more memory could not be honored. Whether that's fatal or not depends on your application. For example, suppose your application is a container that hosts some sort of applets. Should a request for too much memory by one of these applets kill all the others? Like all exceptions, the severity of OOME depends on the caller, not the thrower. – erickson Aug 4 '12 at 19:14
    
@SteveB:So you are saying monitoring GC than counting the OOMs is more reliable? – Cratylus Aug 5 '12 at 8:06
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I'm saying it's pretty much pointless to count oom because after you get an oom you're likely to be done. That is, Your count is likely to be .0 0 0 0 1 crash. – Steve B. Aug 5 '12 at 20:11
    
@SteveB.:I don't understand why you say this.An OOM is just a failure for a specific memory request.It does not mean that the system does not have enough memory to execute.To give an extreme example imagine that the max heap size is set t 1.5GB.And the heap used is 1.2 GB. Then some specific thread requests 500MB e.g. for some huge tree in-memory representation. This request can not be honored and an OOM occurs. But there are still 300MB available for the application to function. So game is not over yet. Unless you get a constand OOM flow of errors – Cratylus Aug 6 '12 at 20:54

Such a thing could be useful, but I haven't used one myself. One thing I try to do is to avoid allocating memory at the request of clients.

Think of something like a processor for HTTP's chunked encoding. Each chunk is prefixed by a length. You could allocate a buffer of that length, then read the data into it, and that is in fact what most servers do, because it's fast and easy.

But I prefer to use something like a ByteArrayOutputStream, that can grow as needed. When I begin parsing, I wrap the input stream in a length-limiting decorator that throws an exception if the total amount of data read is unreasonably large.

The limit would be configurable for the application. So, for example, if I'm processing forms, I might limit input to a few kilobytes. If I'm supporting image uploads, maybe its a few megabytes. But if some joker claims to be sending a multi-gigabyte chunk, I don't want my server to blindly attempt to allocate a buffer for it.

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