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In my asp.net mvc controller`s constructor I have multiple (5) interfaces which communicate with my database in this way:

[HttpGet]
public ActionResult Create()
{          
 var releases = _releaseDataProvider.GetReleases();
 var templates = _templateDataProvider.GetTemplates();
 var createTestplanViewModel = new CreateTestplanViewModel(templates, releases);
 return PartialView(createTestplanViewModel);
}

Above I use 2 different interfaces to get data from the database.

business case: To create a testplan I need to show the user the available releases + templates he can choose from.

How can I decrease the dependency/over-injection of these 2 interfaces

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1  
I only see 2 dependencies. Please show your constructor with the other 3. –  danludwig Aug 4 '12 at 19:40
    
There are other dataprovider method used getting data from other tables. –  Elisa Aug 4 '12 at 21:23
add comment

3 Answers 3

In the MVC project:

public class MyController : Controller
{
    private readonly IQueryProcessor _queryProcessor;

    public MyController(IQueryProcessor queryProcessor)
    {
        _queryProcessor = queryProcessor;
    }

    [HttpGet]
    public ActionResult Create()
    {
        var releases = _queryProcessor.Execute(new ProvideReleaseData());
        var templates = _queryProcessor.Execute(new ProvideTemplateData());
        var createTestplanViewModel = AutoMapper.Mapper
            .Map<CreateTestplanViewModel>(releases);
        AutoMapper.Mapper.Map(templates, createTestplanViewModel);
        return PartialView(createTestplanViewModel);
    }
}

You can then constructor inject your current provider implementations into IQueryHandler implementations. The IQueryProcessor is just infrastructure. See this for more info: http://www.cuttingedge.it/blogs/steven/pivot/entry.php?id=92

Reply to comments:

It's at the site I linked to. Here's mine:

using System.Diagnostics;
using SimpleInjector;

namespace MyApp.Infrastructure
{
    sealed class SimpleQueryProcessor : IQueryProcessor
    {
        private readonly Container _container;

        public SimpleQueryProcessor(Container container)
        {
            _container = container;
        }

        [DebuggerStepThrough]
        public TResult Execute<TResult>(IDefineQuery<TResult> query)
        {
            var handlerType = typeof(IHandleQueries<,>)
                .MakeGenericType(query.GetType(), typeof(TResult));

            dynamic handler = _container.GetInstance(handlerType);

            return handler.Handle((dynamic)query);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
How does your QueryProcessor class look like? –  Elisa Aug 4 '12 at 20:59
    
It's at the link in my answer. I have posted my version, to show namespaces. –  danludwig Aug 4 '12 at 21:36
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A good general way to decouple your database would be using a unit of work. Here's a great article on from asp.net, as well as another article on MSDN.

In summary, you create a single unit where all of your database/service calls reside and it can handle the database logic. This would reduce the dependancy of your multiple interfaces into a single point, so you would only need to inject 1 class into your controller.

A quote from the MSDN article:

According to Martin Fowler, the Unit of Work pattern "maintains a list of objects affected by a business transaction and coordinates the writing out of changes and the resolution of concurrency problems."

share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure the UOW pattern is not a misuse in my case? I do not maintain a list ob objects in the unitOfWork class if I would create such a class. Ok I can inject all my 6 dataprovider interfaces and each controller would get this unitofwork class injected. Hm... Should it work this way? And when I would have 40 repository interfaces they are all in the UOW class? crazy ?? –  Elisa Aug 4 '12 at 21:22
    
I think if you have 40 interfaces, I think that's even more of a reason to use the unit of work. What if you change something in how you create the interfaces? You would need to change all of that in all your controllers! –  Mark Oreta Aug 4 '12 at 22:16
    
Unit of Work pattern seems to be used only with ORMapper like EF. As you have not mentioned that would it fit at all into my situation using bad old ADO.NET ;-) ? –  Elisa Aug 5 '12 at 7:23
    
When I look at web samples they often inject a customerRepository AND a UnitOfWork into the controller does that make sense concerning your answer? –  Elisa Aug 5 '12 at 7:54
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EDIT

It seems to me you basically have these options to reduce constructor dependency count here:

  1. Split the controller
  2. Add layer in front of the two interfaces
  3. Switch to property injection
  4. Service locator

#3 and #4 are included for good measure, but they obviously don't actually decrease the dependency count, they only hide them from the constructor. They also have several disadvantages, and I consider service locator especially evil most of the time.

For #1, if you feel your constructor is actually doing two+ jobs, and there is a clean separation where you could split, I would do so. I assume from your responses that you have already considered this, however, and don't want to do this.

That leaves #2 - adding another layer. In this case that would be introducing a factory interface for that particular view model. Naively, I'll name this ICreateTestplanViewModelFactory, but you can name it something more sensical for your app if you wish. A single method on it would construct a CreateTestplanViewModel.

This makes the fact that the data for this view is coming from 2 sources merely an implementation detail. You would wire up an implementation which takes IReleaseDataProvider and ITemplateDataProvider as constructor dependencies.


This is along the lines of what I was suggesting:

public interface IProvideTestPlanSetupModel
{
    CreateTestplanViewModel GetModel();
}

public class TestPlanSetupProvider : IProvideTestPlanSetupModel
{
    private readonly IReleaseDataProvider _releaseDataProvider;
    private readonly ITemplateDataProvider _templateDataProvider;

    public TestPlanSetupProvider(IReleaseDataProvider releaseDataProvider, ITemplateDataProvider templateDataProvider)
    {
        _releaseDataProvider = releaseDataProvider;
        _templateDataProvider = templateDataProvider;
    }

    public CreateTestplanViewModel GetModel()
    {
        var releases = _releaseDataProvider.GetReleases();
        var templates = _templateDataProvider.GetTemplates();

        return new CreateTestplanViewModel(releases, templates);
    }
}

public class TestPlanController : Controller
{
    private readonly IProvideTestPlanSetupModel _testPlanSetupProvider;

    public TestPlanController(IProvideTestPlanSetupModel testPlanSetupProvider)
    {
        _testPlanSetupProvider = testPlanSetupProvider;
    }

    [HttpGet]
    public ActionResult Create()
    {
        var createTestplanViewModel = _testPlanSetupProvider.GetModel();
        return PartialView(createTestplanViewModel);
    }
}

If you don't like constructing a view model anywhere outside the controller, the interface could provide an intermediate object with the same properties that you would copy to the view model. But that is silly, as this combination of data is only relevant for that particular view, which is precisely what the view model is supposed to represent.

On a side note, it seems you are running into pretty common annoyances doing read/write through the same model. Since these issues bother you so, you might investigate CQRS, which perhaps would make you feel less dirty about talking to the database directly for these types of queries and would help you get around the layering labyrinth we all enjoy so much. It seems promising, though I have not yet had the pleasure of test driving it in a production application.

share|improve this answer
    
"this will pull out a domain concept you weren't explicitly modelling before." Right I would have to add a Template and Release collection to my Testplan entity. Then I get boeth collection from database and assign those collections to Testplan.Templates and Testplan.Releases. I just do not like collections which are initialized in the class ctor (Testplan here) These collections would be properties where I have to check for null actually. Dont like that design. –  Elisa Aug 4 '12 at 21:09
    
And... the Testplan would have these 2 collections filled but all the other properties are empty. That make no sense. –  Elisa Aug 4 '12 at 21:50
    
I did misunderstand that this was a query to set up the creation of a test plan. The pattern I mentioned only make sense in the domain for process abstraction. For the query side of things, a view model abstract factory is analagous and can be useful for consolidating query dependencies. This would essentially give you the same thing in your presentation layer with no intermediate entity. –  Jeremy Rosenberg Aug 4 '12 at 22:06
    
#2 Introduce a Service makes most sense here but as I said before I do not want to introduce in all my business objects collections to other objects.For example the Testplan takes 2 collections in this one case in another case when the Testplan is saved/created I do not/can not pass 2 collections would not make sense. Well I guess I have to learn more about architecture to make this more right . I have googled about ViewModels and Factories and I do not want to use it in my case. –  Elisa Aug 5 '12 at 7:32
    
You would only be moving the code from the Create action into its own class. You don't need to touch your business objects nor add to them. –  Jeremy Rosenberg Aug 5 '12 at 15:34
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