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I'm almost 100% sure I have the syntax right in both of these classes, however I'm getting the following errors:

For CShape.cpp - "error C2011: 'CShape' : 'class' type redefinition" For CCircle.cpp - "error CS2504: 'CShape': base class undefined"

Here is the full code for CShape.cpp

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class CShape
{
protected:
    float area;
    virtual void calcArea();
public:
    float getArea()
    {
        return area;
    }
}

And here is the code for CCircle.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include "CShape.cpp"
#define _USE_MATH_DEFINES
#include "math.h"
using namespace std;

class CCircle : public CShape
{
protected:
    int centerX;
    int centerY;
    float radius;
    void calcArea()
    {
        area = M_PI * (radius * radius);
    }
public:
    CCircle(int pCenterX, int pCenterY, float pRadius)
    {
        centerX = pCenterX;
        centerY = pCenterY;
        radius = pRadius;
    }
    float getRadius()
    {
        return radius;
    }
}

As you can see, CShape is the base class that CCircle is suppsoed to inherit from. I'm pretty new to C++, so I could have the file structures wrong (maybe the base is supposed to be in a header file?), if something like that matters.

share|improve this question
    
Header guard for the header file is absent? How about placing #pragma once at the beginning of the CShape.h? By the way, using namespace ...; is a bad smell for the header files. –  Sergey Brunov Aug 4 '12 at 21:10
3  
You forgot the semicolons at the end of the class definitions. –  Kerrek SB Aug 4 '12 at 21:11
    
@KerrekSB, yeah, it is not C# or Java! –  Sergey Brunov Aug 4 '12 at 21:12
1  
@Serge #pragma once is MS Visual C++ proprietary, you should use good old include blocker #ifndef <myheaderdef>, #define <myheaderdef>, #endif for portable code. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Aug 4 '12 at 21:29
    
@g-makulik, completely agree with you! –  Sergey Brunov Aug 4 '12 at 21:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Never #include .cpp files; that will lead to the kind of redefinition errors you are getting. Instead, declare the class in a header file and #include that one, and define the class methods in a .cpp file.

// CShape.h
class CShape
{
protected:
    float area;
    virtual void calcArea();
public:
    float getArea();
}

// CShape.cpp
#include "CShape.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

float CShape::getArea() {
    return area;
}

You should split up CCircle similarly - and CCircle.h should #include CShape.h, and CCircle.cpp should #include CCircle.h.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! In order to make a Circle, Triangle, Rectangle, etc class that extend the CShape class would it be best to include all those class definitions in the CShape header file then simply define the class methods in their respective .cpp files? Basically you'd just have one header file and a .cpp file for every shape you needed to create. –  NealR Aug 4 '12 at 21:29
1  
@NealR no, CShape shouldn't know anything about derived classes. The derived classes should include the CShape header. –  juanchopanza Aug 4 '12 at 22:14
    
Indeed; the best practice is to have one .h and one .cpp file for each class. –  Aasmund Eldhuset Aug 4 '12 at 22:33

As you guessed, you should organize your classes in separate files for declaration (header file) and definition (.cpp file). You may leave member function definitions (with body) as (suggested) inline in the header files. Put appropriate include blockers into your header files, to avoid multiple class declarations.

CShape.h:

#ifndef __CSHAPE_H__
#define __CSHAPE_H__
class CShape
{
protected:
    float area;
    virtual void calcArea();
public:
    float getArea()
    {
        return area;
    }
};
#endif

CShape.cpp:

#include "CShape.h"

void CShape::calcArea()
{
    // Your implementation
}

CCircle.h:

#ifndef __CCIRCLE_H__
#define __CCIRCLE_H__
#include "CShape.h"

class CCircle : public CShape
{
protected:
    int centerX;
    int centerY;
    float radius;
    virtual void calcArea();
    {
        area = M_PI * (radius * radius);
    }
public:
     CCircle(int pCenterX, int pCenterY, float pRadius);
     inline float getRadius()
     {
         return radius;
     }
};
#endif

CCircle.cpp:

#include "CCircle.h"

CCircle::CCircle(int pCenterX, int pCenterY, float pRadius)
: centerX(pCenterX)
, centerY(pCenterY)
, radius(pRadius)
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
thx, you guys rock! –  NealR Aug 4 '12 at 21:47

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