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The code below produces "t1 t1 t2". I wondered if someone could please tell me how to change it so as to get "t1 t2 t2". It is an error to use "override" instead of "member" in t2, and I don't understand why. I am more than happy to RTFM, if only I would know where and in what FM to look.

Many thanks in advance, and sorry if I missed some fundamental reason for why what I want should not be possible.

type myinterface =
   abstract member doit : unit -> unit

type t1 () =
   interface myinterface with
      member x.doit () = printf "t1\n"

type t2 () =
    inherit t1 ()

    member x.doit () = printf "t2\n"

let override_test () =
    let t1 = t1 () :> myinterface
    let t2 = t2 ()
    let t2i = t2 :> myinterface
    t1.doit ()
    t2i.doit ()
    t2.doit ()
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This should have the behavior you want:

type myinterface =
    abstract member doit : unit -> unit

type T1 () =
    interface myinterface with
        member x.doit () = printfn "t1"

type T2 () =
    inherit T1 ()
    member x.doit () = printfn "t2"
    interface myinterface with
        member x.doit () = x.doit ()

let override_test () =
    let t1i = T1() :> myinterface
    let t2 = T2()
    let t2i = t2 :> myinterface
    t1i.doit ()
    t2i.doit ()
    t2.doit ()
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Many thanks for the answer. I wondered if you could point me to an explanation for why there seem to be two rather easily confused namespaces, i.e. why is it useful to have two easily confused versions of doit ()? Many thanks. –  just me Aug 5 '12 at 8:56
2  
@justme : In F#, interfaces are always implemented explicitly, so one is the interface implementation and the other is just a public member function on the type, completely distinct from the interface. In this case, in T2 the former is implemented in terms of the latter (to avoid having to cast or duplicate code). –  ildjarn Aug 5 '12 at 9:16

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