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A global variable indicates, for each of various kinds of elements, what attributes need to be processed.

<xsl:variable name="attributes.rtf">
  <element name="measure">
    <att>type</att>
    <att>quantity</att>
    <att>unit</att>
  </element>
  <element name="milestone">
    <att>n</att>
  </element>
  <element name="lb">
    <att>ed</att>
    <att>type</att>
    <att>subtype</att>
    <att>n</att>
  </element>
</xsl:variable>
<xsl:variable name="attributes" select="exslt:node-set($attributes.rtf)" /> <!-- This is XSLT 1.0 -->

When the context is an element, I need a for-each that will loop through attributes for that kind of element. I don't see how to do this in one XPath expression. Right now I have these two:

 <xsl:variable name="temp" select="." />                            <!-- For, say, a <measure> element, -->
 <xsl:for-each select="$attributes/element[@name=name($temp)]/att"> <!-- loop through the names "type", "quantity", and "unit" -->
      <xsl:for-each select="$temp/@*[name()=current()]">            <!-- If an attribute of that name exists in the current <measure> element  -->
                                                                    <!-- (now stored as $temp), then process that attribute. --> 
      </xsl:for-each>
 </xsl:for-each>

Is there a way to do this in one expression, without creating $temp.

But also, I need an outer test condition that indicates whether the context element has any of the listed attributes at all. For that test, I'd like one expression.

(Processing of the attributes does need to be ordered, so maybe that requires the two loops. But order would not be relevant in the test condition. So maybe just that could be done with one expression.)

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I. The "simple" problem:

When the context is an element, I need a for-each that will loop through attributes for that kind of element.

No xsl-for-each is needed.

I don't see how to do this in one XPath expression.

Just use:

<xsl:apply-templates select=
  "@*[name()=$attributes/element[@name=name(current())]/att]"/>

Explanation:

Proper use of the current() function.


II. The "complex" problem:

Processing of the attributes does need to be ordered, so maybe that requires the two loops

Here is a complete example showing that no other nested <xsl:apply-templates> is necessary to produce the attributes in the order specified in $attributes:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:exslt="http://exslt.org/common">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

    <xsl:variable name="attributes.rtf">
        <element name="measure">
            <att>type</att>
            <att>quantity</att>
            <att>unit</att>
        </element>
        <element name="milestone">
            <att>n</att>
        </element>
        <element name="lb">
            <att>ed</att>
            <att>type</att>
            <att>subtype</att>
            <att>n</att>
        </element>
    </xsl:variable>

    <xsl:variable name="attributes" select="exslt:node-set($attributes.rtf)" />

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="t/*">
  <xsl:copy>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="$attributes/element[@name=name(current())]/att">
        <xsl:with-param name="pCurrent" select="current()"/>
      </xsl:apply-templates>
      <xsl:apply-templates select=
       "@*[not(name() = $attributes/element[@name=name(current())]/att)]"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="att">
   <xsl:param name="pCurrent" select="/.."/>

  <xsl:if test="$pCurrent[@*[name()=current()]]">
      <xsl:attribute name="{.}">
       <xsl:value-of select="concat(.,'-',.)"/>
      </xsl:attribute>
  </xsl:if>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the following XML document (none was provided!!!):

<t>
  <lb type="normal" ed="uni" n="3"
      subtype="initial" other="yes"/>
  <milestone n="2" other="yes"/>
  <measure quantity="3" unit="cm"
           type="length" other="yes"/>
</t>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<t>
   <lb ed="ed-ed" type="type-type" subtype="subtype-subtype" n="n-n" other="yes"/>
   <milestone n="n-n" other="yes"/>
   <measure type="type-type" quantity="quantity-quantity" unit="unit-unit" other="yes"/>
</t>
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+1 but could you please add some more explanatory comments for the rest of us :) ? –  FailedDev Aug 4 '12 at 23:47
    
Yes, I see. I do still need the processing to be ordered as in $attributes. And this wouldn't do that, right? But it would provide the one expression for the text condition. And that's good. Thanks. –  JPM Aug 4 '12 at 23:48
2  
Another part of the explanation is that in XSL, = means at least one of the things on the left equals one on the right. And since the things on each side are strings, the test is: does name() appear in the list of <att> values. –  JPM Aug 4 '12 at 23:53
    
@JPM, Your understanding of the = operator is correct. –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 5 '12 at 0:48
    
@JPM, I updated the answer with a transformation that uses a single xsl:apply-templates for the processing and generates the processed attributes in the order their names are referenced in the corresponding $attributes/element -- no second/nested processing is needed at all. –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 5 '12 at 1:37
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