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I think I must be missing something with slowcheetah. I created a new asp.net mvc3 application. Added one appsetting to web.config with a default value. Then I added one transform to each the debug and release config files. I also created a view that reads in this value. When I preview the transform the transformation works fine. My understanding was that if I run the project in release mode then the project would read in the app setting from the release transformation, and if I ran the project in debug mode it would read in the app setting from the debug configuration.

Here is the relevant part of web.config

<appSettings>      
    <add key="cheetah_val" value="default_val"/>
  </appSettings>

here is web.debug.config

<?xml version="1.0"?>

<configuration xmlns:xdt="http://schemas.microsoft.com/XML-Document-Transform">  

  <appSettings>
    <add key="cheetah_val" value="debug_val" xdt:Transform="Replace" xdt:Locator="Match(key)"/>

  </appSettings>
  <system.web>

  </system.web>
</configuration>

here is web.release.config

<?xml version="1.0"?>

<configuration xmlns:xdt="http://schemas.microsoft.com/XML-Document-Transform">

  <appSettings>
    <add key="cheetah_val" value="release_val" xdt:Transform="Replace" xdt:Locator="Match(key)"/>

  </appSettings>
  <system.web>
    <compilation xdt:Transform="RemoveAttributes(debug)" />

  </system.web>
</configuration>

The HomeController.cs

public class HomeController : Controller
    {
        public ActionResult Index()
        {    

            ViewBag.CheetahMessage = System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["cheetah_val"];   
            return View();
        }          
    }

And index.cshtml

@{
    ViewBag.Title = "Home Page";
}

<h2>@ViewBag.CheetahMessage</h2>

I would expect the output to be release_val in release mode and debug_val in debug mode. What am I doing wrong? Or am I missing something important? For web sites does the F5 functionality not work? For web sites do I have to actually publish this to get the transformation to work?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

My understanding was that if I run the project in release mode then the project would read in the app setting from the release transformation, and if I ran the project in debug mode it would read in the app setting from the debug configuration.

That was also my assumption when I originally read about and downloaded slowcheetah.

For web sites do I have to actually publish this to get the transformation to work?

AFAIK, you have to publish for both web sites and web application projects to get the transformation to work. Slowcheetah doesn't even do this, it's the VS publish tool that does it. Slowcheetah only lets you preview the transforms.

If I'm wrong on this someone please speak up, because I too would like to be able to run transforms when debugging locally in IIS Express.

One possible solution could be to set up real IIS on your machine to serve from your publish directory. Then when you want to see how the transforms affect behavior, you can publish the web to IIS and use it to view the site. I don't think this would let you attach a debugger though.

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Seeing how no one else is chiming in to correct this I will assume it is correct. I can achieve my immediate goals by making web.config have the developer settings and then have the release transformations in Web.Release.config. This will work for a single developer but would require all developers to have the same setup. I was hoping for that generic 'F5' transformation but that must not apply to web apps. –  voam Aug 5 '12 at 16:10
1  
If anyone else comes in and proves me wrong, I will happily edit the answer so you can unmark it. Like I said, I want to be able to get transforms on F5 too. –  danludwig Aug 5 '12 at 16:12
1  
That is correct for web projects the support is built in and it kicks in during publish/package only. If SlowCheetah were to modify web.config under the hood it may cause issues with VS. If you are interested in a workaround to enable it ready my blog at sedodream.com/2010/10/21/…. –  Sayed Ibrahim Hashimi Aug 7 '12 at 16:57
1  
I really thought it would work out of the box, as the image on the addon-page says: "F5 -> Transform -> Run". It should say "Publish -> Transform -> Run"? –  cederlof Dec 11 '12 at 10:16
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My understanding is that SlowCheetah is for the App.Config not the web.config

Doing the same thing for web.config should already be a standard part of VS2010.

Here's Scott Hanselman talking about it (look at 6 min 20 seconds) http://www.hanselman.com/blog/WebDeploymentMadeAwesomeIfYoureUsingXCopyYoureDoingItWrong.aspx

And this is him writing about SlowCheetah http://www.hanselman.com/blog/SlowCheetahWebconfigTransformationSyntaxNowGeneralizedForAnyXMLConfigurationFile.aspx

I used SlowCheetah for my app.config and it works perfectly.

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-1 SlowCheetah does in fact work for web.config. –  danludwig Aug 7 '12 at 16:59
    
Since VS2010 already supports transform files for the web.config without the need of slowcheetah it seems a little redundant to me to also put that in slowcheetah. –  Erwin Hekkert Aug 10 '12 at 6:23
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