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I'm using PHP preg_replace with the following regex:

/(?<=#EXTINF:([0-9])+,).+?(?=#EXT)/gsm

operating on the following string:

#EXTM3U
#EXT-X-TARGETDURATION:10
#EXTINF:10,
Grab_this_string
#EXTINF:5,
Grab_this_string_too
#EXT-X-ENDLIST

This replaces:

, Grab_this_string 
Grab_this_string_too

I'm trying to match it without the first comma (essentially everything that is between #EXTINF:xx, and the next #EXTINF:

Grab_this_string 
Grab_this_string_too
share|improve this question
    
Have you considered using regular expressions to match the #EXTINF blocks, but then using normal string operations to get the content between the blocks? –  icktoofay Aug 5 '12 at 1:34
    
@icktoofay, yea I sure can hack around it (probably using preg_replace_callback + what you're suggesting)...but I'm just learning regex and not being able to do what I'm trying to do with regex (exclusively), baffled me a bit. –  Emile Aug 5 '12 at 2:05
1  
While you might be able to do this with regular expressions, it isn't a great fit for them. If you have to break out ?<= (which I believe is a little obscure, although others may disagree), it might mean that you're trying to push them a little bit too far. –  icktoofay Aug 5 '12 at 2:10
    
+1 Good comment on the nature of regex. I just assumed it was almighty. –  Emile Aug 5 '12 at 2:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since you're in multiline mode, you could match on line endings to delineate each line.

This matches two lines and replaces them with the first line only (effectively removing the second line). Notice I've removed "dotall" mode (s).

$regex = '/(^#EXTINF:\d+,$)(\s+)^.+$(?=\s+^#EXT)/m';

echo preg_replace($regex, '$1', $str);

Output:

#EXTM3U
#EXT-X-TARGETDURATION:10
#EXTINF:10,
#EXTINF:5,
#EXT-X-ENDLIST

Update:

Using a lookbehind will not work, as it requires variable-length matching, which is unsupported in most regex engines (including PCRE, which PHP uses).

If you want to capture only the line you want to remove and not have to replace two lines with a subpattern match like I did above, you can use the \K escape sequence to simulate a lookbehind that is not subject to variable-length restrictions. \K resets the match's start position, so anything that was matched before the \K will not be included in the final match. (See the last paragraph here.)

$regex = '/^#EXTINF:\d+,\s+\K^.+?(?=#EXT)/sm';

echo preg_replace($regex, '', $str);
share|improve this answer
    
Okay, this grabs the #EXTINF:10, and reinserts it, which I guess is a partial answer. But I guess I aiming to clear up my understanding of regex and why I can't just grab that middle piece. Although, if no one knows how to grab it, I'll accept this as the answer. Thanks for the help! –  Emile Aug 5 '12 at 2:04
1  
@Emile What confuses me is that variable length matches (repetition) are not allowed in lookbehinds in PHP. But ([0-9])+ clearly seems to do that. Strangely, if you simply remove the parentheses and change it to [0-9]+, you'll get an error stating the problem I mentioned. But, I will see if I can add an answer in the form you desire. –  Wiseguy Aug 5 '12 at 2:12
    
Oh, I didn't know variable length matches weren't allowed in lookbehinds. That probably sums it up then. Thanks! –  Emile Aug 5 '12 at 2:23
    
@Emile A few flavors support it, but most do not. See the "Important Notes About Lookbehind" section for more info. (PHP uses PCRE.) I might ask a new question why the parentheses allow the pattern to compile. Thanks for the inspiration. –  Wiseguy Aug 5 '12 at 2:27
1  
@Emile After scouring the PCRE docs, I've actually found an obscure escape character that accomplishes what you originally wanted. See my update. –  Wiseguy Aug 5 '12 at 3:25

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