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I´m new to git and I´m having this weird thing. I checkout to a branch, do some changes, then I checkout to master and the changes I made in the other branch are there. I´m not sure if I misunderstand the concept or I´m doing something wrong. The git version is 1.7.11-preview20120710 from msysgit.

This is a sequence of commands I made, I remove the file text.txt in mybranch, then in master the file is removed too.

db@DB-PC /f/Projects/Controls (master) 
$ ls
AcNumericSingleToolStripTextBox.vb  NumericSingleTextBox.vb

db@DB-PC /f/Projects/Controls (master)
$ touch text.txt

db@DB-PC /f/Projects/Controls (master)
$ git checkout -b mybranch
Switched to a new branch 'mybranch'

db@DB-PC /f/Projects/Controls (mybranch)
$ ls
AcNumericSingleToolStripTextBox.vb  NumericSingleTextBox.vb  text.txt

db@DB-PC /f/Projects/Controls (mybranch)
$ rm text.txt

db@DB-PC /f/Projects/Controls (mybranch)
$ ls
AcNumericSingleToolStripTextBox.vb  NumericSingleTextBox.vb

db@DB-PC /f/Projects/Controls (mybranch)
$ git checkout master
D       Controls/text.txt
Switched to branch 'master'
Your branch is ahead of 'origin/master' by 5 commits.

db@DB-PC /f/Projects/Controls (master)
$ ls
AcNumericSingleToolStripTextBox.vb  NumericSingleTextBox.vb

Text.txt is not in master anymore.

Edit for depot

I had the problem before creating that example text.txt. Now I renamed AcNumericSingleToolStripTextBox.vb to NumericSingleToolStripTextBox.vb in mybranch, and I can see the change in master:

db@DB-PC /f/Projects/Controls (master)
$ ls
AcNumericSingleToolStripTextBox.vb  NumericSingleTextBox.vb

db@DB-PC /f/Projects/Controls (master)
$ git status
# On branch master
# Your branch is ahead of 'origin/master' by 7 commits.
#
nothing to commit (working directory clean)

db@DB-PC /f/Projects/Controls (master)
$ git checkout -b mybranch
Switched to a new branch 'mybranch'

db@DB-PC /f/Projects/Controls (mybranch)
$ ls
AcNumericSingleToolStripTextBox.vb  NumericSingleTextBox.vb

db@DB-PC /f/Projects/Controls (mybranch)
$ mv AcNumericSingleToolStripTextBox.vb NumericSingleToolStripTextBox.vb

db@DB-PC /f/Projects/Controls (mybranch)
$ ls
NumericSingleTextBox.vb  NumericSingleToolStripTextBox.vb

db@DB-PC /f/Projects/Controls (mybranch)
$ git checkout master
D       Controls/AcNumericSingleToolStripTextBox.vb
Switched to branch 'master'
Your branch is ahead of 'origin/master' by 7 commits.

db@DB-PC /f/Projects/Controls (master)
$ ls
NumericSingleTextBox.vb  NumericSingleToolStripTextBox.vb 
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

In your example, Git was never told to track text.txt.

Before you checkout of master, you must tell Git to track it.

$ git add text.txt

Once text.txt is staged, commit the addition to the branch.

$ git commit -m 'Added text.txt'

While on mybranch, tell Git that you want to remove text.txt. Associate that change with mybranch by committing the change.

$ git rm text.txt
$ git commit -m 'Removed text.txt'

After checking out to the master branch, Git will restore its state and text.txt.

share|improve this answer
    
Out of curiousity (I guess I could find this out myself), do you need to also commit the file or is just adding it enough? Also, I find it interesting that after switching back to master it output this line: D Controls/text.txt as if it did something to the file. What is that? :) – Sunil D. Aug 5 '12 at 3:47
    
Yes, the change needs to be committed. That output puzzles me, too! – ustasb Aug 5 '12 at 4:21
    
I edited my question and added another example with files already tracked. It happens again. – DanielB Aug 5 '12 at 5:33
    
Ok, I think I got the idea at last. You have to commit all your changes before changing the branch, else pandora´s box opens again! I don´t see the safety, I lost a file trying to manage this. – DanielB Aug 5 '12 at 5:52
    
If you have uncommitted changes and you change a branch, git will try to bring those changes along to the new branch. Which means, the changes will be on your workarea, but not committed in the new branch. See git status. You can use git reset --hard to get rid of all workarea modifications. – user1338062 Aug 5 '12 at 9:53

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