Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Problem

PHP uses the PCRE regex library, which does not support repetition in lookbehinds.

If repetition is in the lookbehind (e.g., (?<=\d+)), PHP will normally issue a warning like this:

Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: lookbehind assertion is not fixed length at offset 7 in lookbehind.php on line 10

However, I have found a case where compilation does not fail when I think it should.

These fail to compile, as expected:

  • /(?<=X*)a/
  • /(?<=X+)a/
  • /(?<=(X)*)a/

However, /(?<=(X)+)a/ does compile. This should be functionally equivalent to /(?<=(X){1,})a/, which also compiles. On the other hand, if I actually add an upper bound to that range
(e.g., /(?<=(X){1,2})a/), that fails to compile. I think /(?<=(X)+)a/ and /(?<=(X){1,})a/ should also fail to compile, but they do not. Why not?

Experimentation

Here's some code:

$str = 'aXaaXXaaaXXXaaaa';

$regex = '/(?<=((?:X)+))a+/';

preg_match_all($regex, $str, $matches, PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE|PREG_SET_ORDER);
print_r($matches);

I've complicated the pattern slightly to add a capturing group around the multiple Xs. Here are my results:

Array (
    [0] => Array (
            [0] => Array (
                    [0] => aa
                    [1] => 2
                )
            [1] => Array (
                    [0] => X
                    [1] => 1
                )
        )
    [1] => Array (
            [0] => Array (
                    [0] => aaa
                    [1] => 6
                )
            [1] => Array (
                    [0] => X
                    [1] => 5
                )
        )
    [2] => Array (
            [0] => Array (
                    [0] => aaaa
                    [1] => 12
                )
            [1] => Array (
                    [0] => X
                    [1] => 11
                )
        )
)

It clearly matches the as that follow Xs, which is correct. However, subpattern 1 appears to only match one X, not all of them. If I add an a at the beginning of the lookbehind so that it must find all the Xs in between, here are my results:

$regex = '/(?<=(a(?:X)+))a+/';
Array (
    [0] => Array (
            [0] => Array (
                    [0] => aa
                    [1] => 2
                )
            [1] => Array (
                    [0] => aX
                    [1] => 0
                )
        )
)

It only matches once (where there is only one X). Effectively, (X)+ and (X){1,} are being reduced to (X){1} (which is allowable due to its fixed length).

Conclusion

I hate to cry, "Bug!" as soon as I find something that doesn't do what I expect, but it sure seems like one. The pattern isn't rejected like I expect, and then it doesn't behave as I would expect it to even if it were a valid pattern.

So I ask:

  • Is there a valid reason why it should behave this way?
  • Why does this apply to + but not *?
  • Why do parentheses matter (X+ fails; (X)+ is allowed)?

Any insight is most appreciated. Thank you.

share|improve this question
2  
bugs.php.net is probably the place for this. –  vascowhite Aug 5 '12 at 6:09
1  
@vascowhite Well, yeah. The point of this question is to ask before I submit it if it's indeed a bug or just my lack of knowledge. –  Wiseguy Aug 5 '12 at 6:17
1  
I would say that you've done enough testing and research to be reasonably confident that you've found a bug. If it isn't it will be closed as such with an explanation from the guys that wrote/maintain the software. Either way you get resolution much faster than you probably will here. I would say, submit it. You've already done a lot of work and this is the meat of an excellent bug report. –  vascowhite Aug 5 '12 at 7:53
    
It's definitely a bug. Also the PCRE bug repository could be appropriate if the bug is reproducible in the latest PCRE version. –  Qtax Aug 9 '12 at 11:41
add comment

2 Answers

It's not a PHP bug. If it is a bug (and it does look like one) it is a PCRE bug and should be reported there. However, check the PCRE version in phpinfo() and compare it with the latest version. If it is not up-to-date try running the same regexes directly in the latest PCRE before posting a bug report.

share|improve this answer
add comment

PCRE version 8.32-RC1 2012-08-08

re> /(?<=(X)+)a/ Failed: lookbehind assertion is not fixed length at offset 8 re>

Probably was a bug. Please update to the latest PCRE.

Btw, you can use \K to create unlimited backreferences.

share|improve this answer
    
So it has since been submitted and fixed? Where did you find this information? I haven't found the bug report or 8.32-RC1 changelog. –  Wiseguy Aug 24 '12 at 15:42
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.