Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have have this query which fetches 2 random rows from a database:

  $query  = "SELECT * FROM foo ORDER BY RAND() LIMIT 2";
  $result = mysql_query($query);

What I want is for the 2 choosen items to be remembered so they can be shown again on the next page, I had the idea this would be done by updating another table with the RAND() info but for the life of me cannot think how to do it nor can I find an info on how to do it.

Edit: The overall idea is to show 2 new items as well as the last 2 items.

Edit 2:

Ok so it looks like it needs to be done using SESSIONS and I have come up with this so far but the results are the current items info rather then the previous

$item_array = array($item_id);
$_SESSION['lastitems'] = $item_array;

foreach($_SESSION['lastitems'] as $key=>$value) {
 echo $value . ' <br />';
}

the problem is I think is that $item_id is actually $row['itemid'] and can only be called from within the while loop hence the SESSIONS like I said before are the current items info rather then the previous how do I "store" so to show previous?

Edit 3: I stuck the above foreach outside the loop but it only returns 1 item

share|improve this question
    
Not possible. order by rand() generates a new random number for EVERY ordering decision made while preparing the result set. it's not a single number carried through the whole operation. –  Marc B Aug 5 '12 at 5:12
    
See my first comment to Fluffeh –  Anna Riekic Aug 5 '12 at 5:18
    
please be aware that order by rand() even with a limit is a very slow operation, especially if your using a large table, MySQL will still read the entire table and then limit the result returned to one record. –  Geoffrey Aug 5 '12 at 5:39
    
What would you suggest as an alternative to my query? –  Anna Riekic Aug 5 '12 at 5:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't get the same order by rand() in two subsequent pages - that's the whole point of ordering by rand in the first place.

If you want to remember the data on the next page, why not stick the output into a $_SESSION and simply refer to it there?

Having said that, you can seed the rand() function with a value along the lines of order by rand(3) which will give you the same results - but that opens up the can of worms where you will need to start passing the same seed to the other pages - which you will probably have to store in a $_SESSION so you end up at square one.

Edit: If you want to add 2 new items, use your query as it is, and keep inserting the data into the $_SESSION variable. You can store arrays in there, so it should work a charm. Pull the data back, add it into the session, display all the results from the session. Next page, get two new results, add to session, display all the results from the session.

Edit 2:

Firstly, make sure you start the session off on each page:

session_start();

You want to treat the $_SESSION array just like any other array:

$query  = "SELECT * FROM foo ORDER BY RAND() LIMIT 2";
$result = mysql_query($query);

Not sure how you iterate through your results before you output, so apply as you see fit:

howeverYouLoopYouQueryResults
{
    $_SESSION['lastitems'][]=$rowFromYourResult;
    // This appends the row to the end of the array
}

Now, when you get to displaying the data you can do something along the lines of:

foreach($_SESSION['lastitems'] as $key=>$value) {
    echo $value . ' <br />';
    // Keep in mind that it will be storing ALL the 
    // items from the row because you used 'select *'
    // You can see what you selected with:
    print_r($_SESSION['lastitems'];
}
share|improve this answer
    
I know you can't get the same on two subsequent pages, the idea is to show 2 new items as well as the last 2 items, I'm not clued up on sessions how would this be done? –  Anna Riekic Aug 5 '12 at 5:09
    
@Fluffeh: Instead of storing it into session, what do you think about my solution? The idea is to randomize order and then use it in following queries. –  Tadeck Aug 5 '12 at 5:11
    
@AnnaRiekic See edit. –  Fluffeh Aug 5 '12 at 5:12
    
Please see op edits –  Anna Riekic Aug 5 '12 at 5:51
    
@AnnaRiekic See Edit. –  Fluffeh Aug 5 '12 at 6:34

In general, if you want to randomize the order and then use that order, you can do it simply by saving ordering information within the table. Just make sure first query is executed rarely, because it will change the order. The second query is just pulling the data based on previously determined order.

First query can save the random ordering into one of the columns:

UPDATE `foo` SET `ordering`=RAND();

and then use it when ordering:

SELECT * FROM `foo` ORDER BY `ordering`;
share|improve this answer
    
This could work, but it would mean that if another user triggered the update statement, it would bork the next display for the first user? Wouldn't you be potentially better off seeding the mysql rand() function to return the same results per user? –  Fluffeh Aug 5 '12 at 5:13
    
@Fluffeh: The assumption is that this is not user dependent, so the user should not trigger re-ordering. This way you do not have to track the user and the solution will not fail if the user clears the session (of course you could use Evercookie, but you may like to avoid that). You get random order changed on a basis defined by you (the owner) without the need to store much data in the session. –  Tadeck Aug 5 '12 at 10:20
    
Yeah, fair call. I would +1 you, but I already did that long ago. I am guessing this is one of those many ways to skin a cat - and everybody picks their favorite way :) –  Fluffeh Aug 5 '12 at 10:28
    
@Fluffeh: Yeah, this actually depends on what you skin the cat for, in my opinion. These two ways differ, but they both have their pros&cons. Anyway, thanks ;) –  Tadeck Aug 5 '12 at 10:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.