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Not sure what I'm doing wrong here. But I want to change the card to the correct format.

For example given the card 1c change it to AC.

Here's some code I've been playing with:

public static void main(String[] args) {

    String[] cards = {"1c", "13s"};

    for (String card : cards) {

        switch (card.toUpperCase()) {
            case "1C":
                card = card.toUpperCase().replace("1C", "AC");
                break;
            case "13S":
                card = card.toUpperCase().replace("13S", "KS");
                break;
            default:
                System.out.println(Arrays.toString(cards));
        }
    }
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(cards));

}

Any help would be great cheers.

share|improve this question
    
Just another thing how do I override the Arrays.toString(cards) to print out a format like for example: AC KS Also how do I only print out the complete hand once?? Thanks for the help. –  FreshWaterJellyFish Aug 5 '12 at 6:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Within the loop, card is just a local variable, and reassigning it doesn't modify the array cards. An immediate fix would be to index over the array so you can reference each element directly:

for (int i = 0; i < cards.length; i++) {
    switch (cards[i].toUpperCase()) {
        case "1C":
            cards[i] = cards[i].toUpperCase().replace("1C", "AC");
            break;
        case "13S":
            cards[i] = cards[i].toUpperCase().replace("13S", "KS");
            break;
        default:
            System.out.println(Arrays.toString(cards));
    }
}

Edit: to answer edhedges' comment, one would need to keep a counter variable outside the loop in order to keep using the enhanced-for syntax:

int i = 0;
for (String card : cards) {
    switch (card.toUpperCase()) {
        case "1C":
            cards[i] = card.toUpperCase().replace("1C", "AC");
            break;
        case "13S":
            cards[i] = card.toUpperCase().replace("13S", "KS");
            break;
        default:
            System.out.println(Arrays.toString(cards));
    }
    i++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I am just curious for my own gain here but is there a way to keep the kind of for loop he has and update the cards array that way? Would one have to keep a counter? –  edhedges Aug 5 '12 at 5:59
1  
@edhedges - Yeah, see my edit. –  Paul Bellora Aug 5 '12 at 6:02
    
Thank you. I prefer the first method but was just curious if Java gave the card local loop variable some sort of index attribute that could be used like cards[card.index]. Seeing from your answer it is necessary to keep your own counter. –  edhedges Aug 5 '12 at 6:05
1  
@edhedges Yeah, the for-each syntax was added primarily to work with Iterables, which have no concept of an index. They also supported arrays with the same syntax (even though something completely different is happening under the hood) but if you need the index within the loop it's less awkward just to use the traditional for. –  Paul Bellora Aug 5 '12 at 6:10
    
Wicked thanks. I didn't even think to use a normal for loop or keep track of the index. –  FreshWaterJellyFish Aug 5 '12 at 6:12

Are you using Java 7? If you are not, you can't use Strings in cases.

See this problem and here(scroll down to Using Strings in switch Statements)

share|improve this answer
    
I'm using the latest java. cheers –  FreshWaterJellyFish Aug 5 '12 at 6:13

You can do this by the following code

public static void main(String[] args) {

    String[] cards = {"1c", "13s"};

    for (int i = 0 ; i < cards.length ; i++) {

        switch (card[i].toUpperCase()) {
            case "1C":
                cards[i] = cards[i].toUpperCase().replace("1C", "AC");
                break;
            case "13S":
                cards[i] = cards[i].toUpperCase().replace("13S", "KS");
                break;
            default:
                System.out.println(Arrays.toString(cards));
        }
    }
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(cards));

}
share|improve this answer
1  
You probably meant cards[i]. –  Paul Bellora Aug 5 '12 at 6:03
    
Updated the value syntex –  Bhavik Ambani Aug 5 '12 at 6:06

In addition to @Paul Borella's answer I would say that this is only possible with Java 7. As Switch statement does not allow String as an expression. So you should get compilation error at line

switch(card.toUpperCase())

If you want to acheive the same functionality then you can go for Enum.

public enum Cards {
 1C, 13S;

   public String replacedString(){
     case 1C : return "AC";
               break;

     case 13S : return "KS";
                break;

     default : return "";
   }    
}
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