Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Most of the tutorials, guides and books that I've found out there are related to OpenGL, explains how to draw a triangle and initialize OpenGL. That's fine. But when they try to explain it they just list a bunch of functions and parameters like:

glClear()
glClearColor()
glBegin()
glEnd()
...

Since I'm not very good at learning things by memory, I always need an answer to "why are we doing this?" so that I'll write that bunch of functions because I remember that I have to set a certain things before doing somethings else and so on not because the tutorial told me so.

Could please someone explain to me what do I have to define to OpenGL (only pure OpenGL, I'm using SFML as background library but that really doesn't matter) before starting to draw something with glBegin() and glEnd()?

Sample answer:

You have to first tell OpenGL what color does it need to clear the screen with. Because each frame needs to be cleared by the previous before we start to draw the current one...

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

First you should know, that OpenGL is a state machine. That means, that apart from creating the OpenGL context (which is done by SFML) there's no such thing as initialization!

Since I'm not very good at learning things by memory,

This is good…

I always need an answer to "why are we doing this?"

This is excellent!

Could please someone explain to me what do I have to define to OpenGL (only pure OpenGL, I'm using SFML as background library but that really doesn't matter) before starting to draw something with glBegin() and glEnd()?

As I already told: OpenGL is a state machine. That basically means, that there are two kinds of calls you can do: Setting state and executing operations.

For example glClearColor sets a state variable, that of the clear color, which value is used for clearing the active framebuffer color to, when a call to glClear with the GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT flag set. There exists a similar function glClearDepth for the depth value (GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT flag to glClear).

glBegin and glEnd belong to the immediate mode of OpenGL, which have been deprecated. So there's little reason in learning them. You should use Vertex Arrays instead, preferrably through Vertex Buffer Objects.

But here it goes: glBegin sets OpenGL in a state that it should now draw geometry, of the kind of primitive selected as parameter to glBegin. GL_TRIANGLES for example means, that OpenGL will now interpret every 3 calls to glVertex as forming a triangle. glEnd tells OpenGL that you've finished that batch of triangles. Within a glBegin…glEnd block certain state changes are disallowed. Among those everything that has to do with transforming the geometry and generating the picture, which matrices, shaders, textures, and some others.

One common misconception is, that OpenGL is initialized. This is due to badly written tutorials which have a initGL function or similar. It's a good practice to set all state from scratch when beginning to render a scene. But since a single frame may contain several scenes (think of a HUD or split screen gaming) this happens several times a scene.


Update:

So how do you draw a triangle? Well, it's simple enough. First you need the geometry data. For example this:

GLfloat triangle[] = {
    -1, 0, 0,
    +1, 0, 0,
     0, 1, 0
};

In the render function we tell OpenGL that the next calls to glDrawArrays or glDrawElements shall fetch the data from there (for the sake of simplicity I'll use OpenGL-2 functions here):

glVertexPointer(3, /* there are three scalars per vertex element */
                GL_FLOAT, /* element scalars are float */
                0, /* elements are tightly packed (could as well be sizeof(GLfloat)*3 */
                trignale /* and there you find the data */ );
/* Note that glVertexPointer does not make a copy of the data! 
   If using a VBO the data is copied when calling glBufferData. */

/* this switches OpenGL into a state that it will
   actually access data at the place we pointed it
   to with glVertexPointer */
glEnableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);

/* glDrawArrays takes data from the supplied arrays and draws them
   as if they were submitted sequentially in a for loop to immediate
   mode functions. Has some valid applications. Better use index
   based drawing for models with a lot of shared vertices. */
glDrawArrays(Gl_TRIANGLE, /* draw triangles */
             0, /* start at index 0 */
             3, /* process 3 elements (of 3 scalars each) */ );

What I didn't include yet is setting up the transformation and viewport mapping.

The viewport defines how the readily projected and normalized geometry is placed in the window. This state is set using glViewport(pos_left, pos_bottom, width, height).

Transformation today happens in a vertex shader, Essentially a vertex shader is a small program written in a special language (GLSL), that takes the vertex attributes and calculates the clip space position of the resulting vertex. The usual approach for this is emulating the fixed function pipeline, which is a two stage process: First transform the geometry into view space (some calculations, like illumination are easier in this space), then project it into clip space, which is kind of the lens of the renderer. In the fixed function pipeline there are two transformation matrices for this: Modelview and Projection. You set them to whatever is required for the desired outcome. In the case of just a triangle, we leave the modelview identity and use a ortho projection from -1 to 1 in either dimension.

glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
/* the following function multiplies onto what's already on the stack,
   so reset it to identity */
glLoadIdentity(); 

/* our clip volume is defined by 6 orthogonal planes with normals X,Y,Z
   and ditance 1 from origin into each direction */
glOrtho(-1, 1, -1, 1, -1, 1); 

glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
/* now a identity matrix is loaded onto the modelview */
glLoadIdentity();

Having set up the transformation we can now draw the triangle as outlined above:

draw_triangle();

Finally we need to tell OpenGL we're done with sending commands and it should finish it's renderings.

if(singlebuffered)
    glFinish();

However most of the time your window is double buffered, so you need to swap it to make things visime. Since swapping makes no sense without finishing the swap implies a finish

else
    SwapBuffers();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for you answer. Then every OpenGL function should be used in each frame (so put in the main loop) right because there's no OpenGL initialization functions, right? –  Jefffrey Aug 5 '12 at 9:36
1  
A mention of glBegin/glEnd being deprecated would be nice. –  Cubic Aug 5 '12 at 11:44
1  
@Cubic: Eh, pleae reread my answer again. It's right there: "glBegin and glEnd belong to the immediate mode of OpenGL, which have been deprecated." –  datenwolf Aug 5 '12 at 16:19
2  
@Jeffrey: Well not every OpenGL function. But everything that is relevant to get the desired outcome, which means setting all the required state, and more importantly making sure no interfering states from previous OpenGL calls mess up your drawing. Up to including OpenGL-2.1 this was a quite a tedious job. Now with OpenGL-3 core profile, which deprecated a lot of the annoying stuff, state space has been reduced to a much smaller, manageable dimensionality. –  datenwolf Aug 5 '12 at 16:21
    
@datenwolf Yeah sorry, somehow missed that line. –  Cubic Aug 5 '12 at 18:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.