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Ran into an odd bug while trying to play around with some perlin noise functions. All of the sudden I got a off value in the middle of all of my calls. Traced it down to an inconsistent return value in fmod().

i=512;
cout << i << ","  << fmod(i/102.4,1.f) << "," << fmod(i/102.4,1.f) << endl;

I would expect to get the following output.

512,0,0

But I don't. I get this.

512,0,1

What is even MORE strange is that if I call the cout line several times, the error goes away on the later runs.

512,0,1
512,0,0
512,0,0

Hard coding the value into the function (replace all the 'y' with '512') results in the correct results (always returns 0).

Has anyone ever seen a result like this?

share|improve this question
    
"Ran into an odd bug" Bug in what? It would be helpful if you mentioned what architecture/platform/compiler/standard library you're using, and post an SSCCE. I get 512,0,0 with VC++ 2012. –  ildjarn Aug 5 '12 at 7:25
2  
I can't reproduce that. What compiler and compiler options are you using? Which header for fmod? Could you make the example a complete, compilable one? –  juanchopanza Aug 5 '12 at 7:26
    
I tried with GCC on my platform (options -Wall -Wextra -pedantic-errors -sdt=c++98) and also on ideone.com –  juanchopanza Aug 5 '12 at 7:32
    
I can reproduce this on gcc 4.5.3 under cygwin. Investigating. –  Martin Aug 5 '12 at 7:39
    
Ok - I've made the last edit to my answer (near the top). I'm not going to have time to look any further into this. –  Martin Aug 5 '12 at 8:52
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Final Edit: This is almost certainly a bug in either GCC or glibc. Simply declaring a function that calls fmod somewhere else in the code (even if that function doesn't get called) makes the problem go away.

I suggest passing -fno-builtins to the compiler to work around this. Thas seems to fix it for me.


I'm able to reproduce this in GCC 4.5.3 for cygwin.

This only happens if the i variable is non-const [Edit: Probably because it's encouraging the compiler to use a temporary to store the result of the initial division). My even simpler C program to test:

#include <stdio.h>

#include <math.h>

int main()
{
    int i = 512;
    printf("%f %f\n", fmod(i/102.4,1.f), fmod(i/102.4,1.f));
    printf("%f %f\n", fmod(i/102.4,1.f), fmod(i/102.4,1.f));

}

Which outputs:

0.000000 1.000000
0.000000 0.000000

I've tried looking through the asm output, but my x87-foo is weak. Can anyone else see what's wrong? I'll keep looking in the meantime:

    .file   "test.cpp"
    .section    .debug_abbrev,"dr"
Ldebug_abbrev0:
    .section    .debug_info,"dr"
Ldebug_info0:
    .section    .debug_line,"dr"
Ldebug_line0:
    .text
Ltext0:
    .def    ___main;    .scl    2;  .type   32; .endef
    .section .rdata,"dr"
LC3:
    .ascii "%f %f\12\0"
    .text
.globl _main
    .def    _main;  .scl    2;  .type   32; .endef
_main:
LFB7:
    .file 1 "test.cpp"
    .loc 1 6 0
    pushl   %ebp
LCFI0:
    movl    %esp, %ebp
LCFI1:
    andl    $-16, %esp
LCFI2:
    subl    $64, %esp
LCFI3:
    .loc 1 6 0
    call    ___main
LBB2:
    .loc 1 7 0
    movl    $512, 60(%esp)
    .loc 1 8 0
    fildl   60(%esp)
    fldl    LC0
    fdivrp  %st, %st(1)
    fld1
    fld %st(1)
L2:
    fprem
    fnstsw  %ax
    sahf
    jp  L2
    fstp    %st(1)
    fucomi  %st(0), %st
    jp  L5
    fucomi  %st(0), %st
    je  L6
    fstp    %st(0)
    jmp L4
L5:
    fstp    %st(0)
L4:
    fld1
    fstpl   8(%esp)
    fstpl   (%esp)
    call    _fmod
    jmp L3
L6:
    fstp    %st(1)
L3:
    fstpl   40(%esp)
    fildl   60(%esp)
    fldl    LC0
    fdivrp  %st, %st(1)
    fld1
    fstpl   8(%esp)
    fstpl   (%esp)
    call    _fmod
    fldl    40(%esp)
    fstpl   12(%esp)
    fstpl   4(%esp)
    movl    $LC3, (%esp)
    call    _printf
    .loc 1 9 0
    fildl   60(%esp)
    fldl    LC0
    fdivrp  %st, %st(1)
    fld1
    fstpl   8(%esp)
    fstpl   (%esp)
    call    _fmod
    fstpl   32(%esp)
    fildl   60(%esp)
    fldl    LC0
    fdivrp  %st, %st(1)
    fld1
    fstpl   8(%esp)
    fstpl   (%esp)
    call    _fmod
    fldl    32(%esp)
    fstpl   12(%esp)
    fstpl   4(%esp)
    movl    $LC3, (%esp)
    call    _printf
LBE2:
    movl    $0, %eax
    .loc 1 10 0
    leave
LCFI4:
    ret
LFE7:
    .section .rdata,"dr"
    .align 8
LC0:
    .long   -1717986918
    .long   1079613849
    .section    .debug_frame,"dr"
Lframe0:
    .long   LECIE0-LSCIE0
LSCIE0:
    .long   0xffffffff
    .byte   0x1
    .ascii "\0"
    .uleb128 0x1
    .sleb128 -4
    .byte   0x8
    .byte   0xc
    .uleb128 0x4
    .uleb128 0x4
    .byte   0x88
    .uleb128 0x1
    .align 4
LECIE0:
LSFDE0:
    .long   LEFDE0-LASFDE0
LASFDE0:
    .secrel32   Lframe0
    .long   LFB7
    .long   LFE7-LFB7
    .byte   0x4
    .long   LCFI0-LFB7
    .byte   0xe
    .uleb128 0x8
    .byte   0x85
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0x4
    .long   LCFI1-LCFI0
    .byte   0xd
    .uleb128 0x5
    .byte   0x4
    .long   LCFI4-LCFI1
    .byte   0xc5
    .byte   0xc
    .uleb128 0x4
    .uleb128 0x4
    .align 4
LEFDE0:
    .section    .eh_frame,"w"
Lframe1:
    .long   LECIE1-LSCIE1
LSCIE1:
    .long   0x0
    .byte   0x1
    .ascii "\0"
    .uleb128 0x1
    .sleb128 -4
    .byte   0x8
    .byte   0xc
    .uleb128 0x4
    .uleb128 0x4
    .byte   0x88
    .uleb128 0x1
    .align 4
LECIE1:
LSFDE3:
    .long   LEFDE3-LASFDE3
LASFDE3:
    .long   LASFDE3-Lframe1
    .long   LFB7
    .long   LFE7-LFB7
    .byte   0x4
    .long   LCFI0-LFB7
    .byte   0xe
    .uleb128 0x8
    .byte   0x85
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0x4
    .long   LCFI1-LCFI0
    .byte   0xd
    .uleb128 0x5
    .byte   0x4
    .long   LCFI4-LCFI1
    .byte   0xc5
    .byte   0xc
    .uleb128 0x4
    .uleb128 0x4
    .align 4
LEFDE3:
    .text
Letext0:
    .section    .debug_loc,"dr"
Ldebug_loc0:
LLST0:
    .long   LFB7-Ltext0
    .long   LCFI0-Ltext0
    .word   0x2
    .byte   0x74
    .sleb128 4
    .long   LCFI0-Ltext0
    .long   LCFI1-Ltext0
    .word   0x2
    .byte   0x74
    .sleb128 8
    .long   LCFI1-Ltext0
    .long   LCFI4-Ltext0
    .word   0x2
    .byte   0x75
    .sleb128 8
    .long   LCFI4-Ltext0
    .long   LFE7-Ltext0
    .word   0x2
    .byte   0x74
    .sleb128 4
    .long   0x0
    .long   0x0
    .section    .debug_info,"dr"
    .long   0x13a
    .word   0x2
    .secrel32   Ldebug_abbrev0
    .byte   0x4
    .uleb128 0x1
    .ascii "GNU C++ 4.5.3\0"
    .byte   0x4
    .ascii "test.cpp\0"
    .ascii "/home/martin\0"
    .long   Ltext0
    .long   Letext0
    .secrel32   Ldebug_line0
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0x4
    .byte   0x7
    .ascii "unsigned int\0"
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0x1
    .byte   0x6
    .ascii "char\0"
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0x1
    .byte   0x6
    .ascii "signed char\0"
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0x1
    .byte   0x8
    .ascii "unsigned char\0"
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0x2
    .byte   0x5
    .ascii "short int\0"
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0x2
    .byte   0x7
    .ascii "short unsigned int\0"
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0x4
    .byte   0x5
    .ascii "int\0"
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0x8
    .byte   0x5
    .ascii "long long int\0"
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0x8
    .byte   0x7
    .ascii "long long unsigned int\0"
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0x4
    .byte   0x5
    .ascii "long int\0"
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0x4
    .byte   0x7
    .ascii "long unsigned int\0"
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0x8
    .byte   0x4
    .ascii "double\0"
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0x4
    .byte   0x4
    .ascii "float\0"
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0xc
    .byte   0x4
    .ascii "long double\0"
    .uleb128 0x3
    .byte   0x1
    .ascii "main\0"
    .byte   0x1
    .byte   0x5
    .long   0x98
    .long   LFB7
    .long   LFE7
    .secrel32   LLST0
    .uleb128 0x4
    .long   LBB2
    .long   LBE2
    .uleb128 0x5
    .ascii "i\0"
    .byte   0x1
    .byte   0x7
    .long   0x98
    .byte   0x2
    .byte   0x74
    .sleb128 60
    .byte   0x0
    .byte   0x0
    .byte   0x0
    .section    .debug_abbrev,"dr"
    .uleb128 0x1
    .uleb128 0x11
    .byte   0x1
    .uleb128 0x25
    .uleb128 0x8
    .uleb128 0x13
    .uleb128 0xb
    .uleb128 0x3
    .uleb128 0x8
    .uleb128 0x1b
    .uleb128 0x8
    .uleb128 0x11
    .uleb128 0x1
    .uleb128 0x12
    .uleb128 0x1
    .uleb128 0x10
    .uleb128 0x6
    .byte   0x0
    .byte   0x0
    .uleb128 0x2
    .uleb128 0x24
    .byte   0x0
    .uleb128 0xb
    .uleb128 0xb
    .uleb128 0x3e
    .uleb128 0xb
    .uleb128 0x3
    .uleb128 0x8
    .byte   0x0
    .byte   0x0
    .uleb128 0x3
    .uleb128 0x2e
    .byte   0x1
    .uleb128 0x3f
    .uleb128 0xc
    .uleb128 0x3
    .uleb128 0x8
    .uleb128 0x3a
    .uleb128 0xb
    .uleb128 0x3b
    .uleb128 0xb
    .uleb128 0x49
    .uleb128 0x13
    .uleb128 0x11
    .uleb128 0x1
    .uleb128 0x12
    .uleb128 0x1
    .uleb128 0x40
    .uleb128 0x6
    .byte   0x0
    .byte   0x0
    .uleb128 0x4
    .uleb128 0xb
    .byte   0x1
    .uleb128 0x11
    .uleb128 0x1
    .uleb128 0x12
    .uleb128 0x1
    .byte   0x0
    .byte   0x0
    .uleb128 0x5
    .uleb128 0x34
    .byte   0x0
    .uleb128 0x3
    .uleb128 0x8
    .uleb128 0x3a
    .uleb128 0xb
    .uleb128 0x3b
    .uleb128 0xb
    .uleb128 0x49
    .uleb128 0x13
    .uleb128 0x2
    .uleb128 0xa
    .byte   0x0
    .byte   0x0
    .byte   0x0
    .section    .debug_pubnames,"dr"
    .long   0x17
    .word   0x2
    .secrel32   Ldebug_info0
    .long   0x13e
    .long   0x10d
    .ascii "main\0"
    .long   0x0
    .section    .debug_pubtypes,"dr"
    .long   0xe
    .word   0x2
    .secrel32   Ldebug_info0
    .long   0x13e
    .long   0x0
    .section    .debug_aranges,"dr"
    .long   0x1c
    .word   0x2
    .secrel32   Ldebug_info0
    .byte   0x4
    .byte   0x0
    .word   0x0
    .word   0x0
    .long   Ltext0
    .long   Letext0-Ltext0
    .long   0x0
    .long   0x0
    .def    _fmod;  .scl    2;  .type   32; .endef
    .def    _printf;    .scl    2;  .type   32; .endef

[Edit: Note, it's always the first call to fmod that is returning the strange result (never later one's). The fmod calls are being evaluated right-to-left.

[Edit 2: Defining a function, double my_fmod(double a, double b) { return fmod(a, b); } and passing the calls through that makes the problem go away. ]

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for SSCCE and assembly output. I can reproduce this with MinGW GCC 4.6.2 (Windows 7). Looking at the assembly code, it seems like GCC tries to replace the first fmod with some fprem magic and only falls back to fmod if fucomi %st(0), %st says st0 != st0 (?!?). That means the first result is computed using only FPU (80-bit precision), whereas all further calls to fmod get thrown around the stack, where they get reduced to 64-bit precision (in this case the result of i/102.4 is stored in st0 as 4.99999999999999972244(0)e+0, but fstpl (%esp) turns it into a qword 5.0). –  DCoder Aug 5 '12 at 10:47
    
Nice work, DCoder. –  Martin Aug 5 '12 at 10:53
1  
Appears to be fixed by GCC 4.7.0 (Fedora 17). Output is 0.000000 0.000000 in both cases, including at -O3. –  Electro Aug 5 '12 at 11:31
    
I can confirm that (at least on windws7 under MinGW) it works on 4.7.0 –  jmurrayufo Aug 6 '12 at 0:33
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It's not a gcc or library bug. It's just a result of an imprecise floating-point representation.

i=512;
cout << i << ","  << fmod(i/102.4,1.f) << "," << fmod(i/102.4,1.f) << endl;

The mathematical result of 512/102.4 is exactly 5. But 102.4 cannot be represented exactly in binary floating-point, so the value passed to fmod could be either exactly 5.0, or slightly above or below it.

If the result of the division is, say, 4.99999999, then fmod(i/102.4,1.f) will return 0.99999999, which will likely be rounded on output to 1.

Try displaying the value with more precision.

You'll need to modify your code so it allows for values very slightly smaller than what you're expecting. Since fmod() is a discontinuous function, it can magnify such differences tremendously.

This program:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <cmath>
int main(void) {
    int i = 512;
    std::cout << i << "," 
              << std::setprecision(20) << fmod(i/102.4,1.f)
              << "," << fmod(i/102.4,1.f) << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

produces this output on my system:

512,0,0.99999999999999977796
share|improve this answer
    
As an experiment, try duplicating the cout line in your code (copy and paste it). I'm sure you agree if this is a precision problem, it should output the same thing twice, as nothing in the output line has any side effects (barring changes to the stream). <br /> On GCC 4.3.5, it gets different results on the second execution. –  Martin Aug 5 '12 at 10:42
    
[Removed comment re correct value: issue is the result should be consistent] –  Martin Aug 5 '12 at 11:03
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