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I'm trying to use ASP MVC 4 and Entity Framework 4 to create pretty simple web site. I need to use the migration feature because I will deploy the application to shared hosting (GoDaddy) and I don't want to manually change tables on each change.

What is the correct way to model one-to-many relations? Using the other entity type or the other entity's primary key type?

When I use the other entity type, which is preferred because it keeps the model cleaner, the migration tools worked but the scaffolding of ASP MVC did not. Even when I've manually add drop down to select the other entity ASP MVC did not parse the request right and did not set the other entity property.

This is the two options:

Option1: Use other entity type.

 public class Tenant {
    [Key]
    public string TenantID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
  }

  public class Survey {
    [Key]
    public string SurveyID { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public Tenant Tenant { get; set; }

    [Required]
    [StringLength(100, MinimumLength=5)]
    public string Title { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public DateTime CreatedAt { get; set; }
  }

Option 2: use primary key type.

  public class Tenant {
    [Key]
    public string TenantID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
  }

  public class Survey {
    [Key]
    public string SurveyID { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string TenantID { get; set; }

    [Required]
    [StringLength(100, MinimumLength=5)]
    public string Title { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public DateTime CreatedAt { get; set; }
  }

I've create MVC controller with scaffolding for the Survey entity in my ASP MVC 4 project. It create the CRUD controller and views. In the view it did not put any field for the Tenant. After I've add it myself the method Create(Tenant tenant) was called but the Tenant field that was sent by the HTML form did not get parsed by MVC and did not set the Tenant field of the Survey entity.

Ido

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Can you show us some code? What have you tried? What went wrong? It would also help if you improved your acceptance rate. –  Wouter de Kort Aug 5 '12 at 10:44

2 Answers 2

These look like you are mapping one-to-one relationships and not one-to-many. If one Survey can have multiple Tenants then:

public class Tenant {
    [Key]
    public string TenantID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
public virtual  Survey Survey  {get; set;}
  }


  public class Survey {
    [Key]
    public string SurveyID { get; set; }

    [Required]
    [StringLength(100, MinimumLength=5)]
    public string Title { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public DateTime CreatedAt { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Tenant> Tenant {get; set;}
}
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I don't need the back-reference from Survey to Tenant yet - only the forward one. Is that critical to have the reference property virtual? –  Ido Ran Aug 5 '12 at 11:30
    
The ICollection navigation property is the important one right now, add the associated 'single' navigation reference only if you need it. No, the property does not need to be virtual - only if you want to use lazy loading and/or proxy change tracking. Neither of these are essential to using EF, but just ensure you explicitly load associated properties with the Include() statement in LINQ. –  Judo Aug 5 '12 at 11:34
    
Your sample code is wrong, In my code each Survey belong to one-and-only-one Tenant. In your sample Survey belong to multiple tensnts. –  Ido Ran Aug 5 '12 at 12:34
    
Your code sample was just a one-to-one mapping so I wasnt sure which side had the many. Thats why I said "If one Survey can have multiple Tenants then..." if the Tenant has multiple Surveys then just use the ICollection on the Tenant - ie public virtual ICollection<Survey> Surveys {get; set;} in the Tenant entity. –  Judo Aug 5 '12 at 12:57
up vote -1 down vote accepted

I've found this series of posts which explain how to make EF models so that they will work with both EF and ASP MVC. The idea is to have both "plain" reference type and strong reference type.

public class Team
{
    public int TeamId { get; set; }
    // ... other Team properties go here

    // Each Team has an optional "next opponent" which is another Team
    public int? NextOpponentId { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("NextOpponentId")] public virtual Team NextOpponent { get; set; }

    // Each Team also has a required Manager and Administrator, both of which are people
    public int ManagerId { get; set; }
    public int AdministratorId { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("ManagerId")] public virtual Person Manager { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("AdministratorId")] public virtual Person Administrator { get; set; }
}
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I've share this solution and it's source so other can benefit from it. If it's bad it will be nice to leave a comment explain why. –  Ido Ran Aug 6 '12 at 11:20

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