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This question already has an answer here:

I need to determine if a value exists in an array.

I am using the following function:

Array.prototype.contains = function(obj) {
    var i = this.length;
    while (i--) {
        if (this[i] == obj) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

The above function always returns false.

The array values and the function call is as below:

arrValues = ["Sam","Great", "Sample", "High"]
alert(arrValues.contains("Sam"));
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Oriol javascript Apr 14 at 19:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

9  
The code works in Safari 4.0.2. BTW: I'd do a === comparison instead of just ==. – Georg Schölly Jul 25 '09 at 8:45
1  
"The above function always returns false." No it doesn't: The function works as expected - the error must be somewhere else. – Christoph Jul 25 '09 at 8:59
2  
See also: stackoverflow.com/q/237104/1569 – Factor Mystic Feb 18 '11 at 21:08
3  
Finally its worked. its due to improper trim of the comparing value. there was some space in the comparing value (A comment from the asker, to the accepted answer.) – ANeves Oct 1 '12 at 9:09
    
It works, you should have used === instead of == – hellol11 Apr 11 at 15:40

19 Answers 19

up vote 807 down vote accepted
var contains = function(needle) {
    // Per spec, the way to identify NaN is that it is not equal to itself
    var findNaN = needle !== needle;
    var indexOf;

    if(!findNaN && typeof Array.prototype.indexOf === 'function') {
        indexOf = Array.prototype.indexOf;
    } else {
        indexOf = function(needle) {
            var i = -1, index = -1;

            for(i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
                var item = this[i];

                if((findNaN && item !== item) || item === needle) {
                    index = i;
                    break;
                }
            }

            return index;
        };
    }

    return indexOf.call(this, needle) > -1;
};

You can use it like this:

var myArray = [0,1,2],
    needle = 1,
    index = contains.call(myArray, needle); // true

CodePen validation/usage

share|improve this answer
2  
Note that indexOf on arrays is not implemented in IE, but you can define it yourself – RaYell Jul 25 '09 at 8:36
6  
you should use a typed comparison with === to be compatible with the native implementation – Christoph Jul 25 '09 at 9:08
2  
fixed the comparison and added the missing return -1; please note that according to the ES5 spec, this method will behave differently from the native one in case ofsigned zeroes and NaNs (see 15.4.4.14 and 9.12 vs. 11.9.6) – Christoph Jul 25 '09 at 9:26
3  
What version of IE does this answer refer to? – Daniel Allen Langdon Feb 24 '12 at 22:20
4  
@RiceFlourCookies, IE < 9. – eyelidlessness Feb 25 '12 at 0:54

jQuery has a utility function for this:

$.inArray(value, array)

Returns index of value in array. Returns -1 if array does not contain value.

See also array.contains(obj) in JavaScript

share|improve this answer
112  
Don't let the name "inArray" fool you. As mentioned above (but of course I didn't read closely enough), returns -1 (not false) if the element doesn't exist. – Greg Bernhardt Apr 19 '11 at 20:13
50  
I can't believe they named the function so badly. – Steve Paul Jun 6 '13 at 8:23
3  
@Steve Paul what is wrong with name? it does what it says: -1=it's NOT there, anything else= it's there – Jeffz Jun 22 '13 at 18:09
80  
'inArray' implies that a boolean will be returned indicating whether the element could be found in the array. Therefore users may feel tempted to use the expression: if ($.inArray('myval', myarray)) {...} This will evaluate to true if 'myval' is NOT in myarray. Furthermore, it will evaluate to false if myval's index is 0. – Steve Paul Jun 24 '13 at 5:11
12  
The non-booleanness of $.inArray's return definitely feels like a mistake on jQuery's part. Surely, it ought to be renamed to $.indexOf, if that's the function it's polyfilling? – ChaseMoskal Mar 7 '14 at 23:01

This is generally what the indexOf() method is for. You would say:

return arrValues.indexOf('Sam') > -1
share|improve this answer
3  
indexOf does not work in <IE9. – Doug S Oct 26 '15 at 0:23
1  
Does not work with NaN – threed Jan 5 at 0:09
33  
Simple and great answer for who has no problem with NaN, don't like jQuery and don't give a sh*t about IE... – Rodrigo Jan 5 at 20:15
19  
why exactly do people still care about IE custom crap? Just put an alert out there ou=n your website: No support for IE! – Sujay Phadke Feb 2 at 7:06
2  
I like how Kenneth J's comment has more upvotes than the answer. But good stuff - I've used indexOf() for strings, but I didn't know you could use it for arrays in general. – doubleDown Feb 4 at 12:02

It's almost always safer to use a library like lodash simply because of all the issues with cross-browser compatibilities and efficiency.

Efficiency because you can be guaranteed that at any given time, a hugely popular library like underscore will have the most efficient method of accomplishing a utility function like this.

_.contains([1, 2, 3], 3); // returns true

If you're concerned about the bulk that's being added to your application by including the whole library, know that you can include functionality separately:

var contains = require('lodash/collections/contains');

Edit: With lodash 4, this had become _.includes() rather than _.contains(). Thanks @shadowhorst for the heads up.

share|improve this answer
    
If this is the only functionality you need from the library, it seems an awful waste to add 5.7kb to your application when you only need a few lines. – threed Jan 5 at 0:18
4  
@threed, you don't have to include the whole library. Partial functionality can be included with require('lodash/collections/contains'). – ncabral Jan 5 at 4:22
1  
FYI: With lodash 4 it's now _.includes() instead of _.contains(). – shadowhorst Apr 17 at 16:44
    
Thanks @shadowhorst. I've edited the answer to reflect this. – ncabral Apr 19 at 4:47

tl;dr

function includes(k) {
  for(var i=0; i < this.length; i++){
    if( this[i] === k || ( this[i] !== this[i] && k !== k ) ){
      return true;
    }
  }
  return false;
}

Example

function includes(k) {
  for(var i=0; i < this.length; i++){
    if( this[i] === k || ( this[i] !== this[i] && k !== k ) ){
      return true;
    }
  }
  return false;
}

function log(msg){
  $('#out').append('<div>' + msg + '</div>');  
}

var arr = [1, "2", NaN, true];
arr.includes = includes;

log('var arr = [1, "2", NaN, true];');
log('<br/>');
log('arr.includes(1): ' + arr.includes(1));
log('arr.includes(2): ' + arr.includes(2));
log('arr.includes("2"): ' + arr.includes("2"));
log('arr.includes(NaN): ' + arr.includes(NaN));
log('arr.includes(true): ' + arr.includes(true));
log('arr.includes(false): ' + arr.includes(false));
#out{
  font-family:monospace;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id=out></div>

Longer Answer

I know this question isn't really about whether or not to extend built-in objects, but the attempt of the OP and the comments on this answer highlight that debate. My comment from Feb 12, '13 cites an article that outlines this debate really well, however that link broke and I can't edit the original comment because too much time has passed, so I include it here.

If you're looking to extend the built-in Array object with a contains method, probably the best and most responsible way to do this would be to use this polyfill from MDN. (See also this section of the MDN article on Prototypical inheritance, which explains that "The only good reason for extending a built-in prototype is to backport the features of newer JavaScript engines; for example Array.forEach, etc.")

if (!Array.prototype.includes) {
  Array.prototype.includes = function(searchElement /*, fromIndex*/ ) {
    'use strict';
    var O = Object(this);
    var len = parseInt(O.length) || 0;
    if (len === 0) {
      return false;
    }
    var n = parseInt(arguments[1]) || 0;
    var k;
    if (n >= 0) {
      k = n;
    } else {
      k = len + n;
      if (k < 0) {k = 0;}
    }
    var currentElement;
    while (k < len) {
      currentElement = O[k];
      if (searchElement === currentElement ||
         (searchElement !== searchElement && currentElement !== currentElement)) {
        return true;
      }
      k++;
    }
    return false;
  };
}

Don't want strict equality, or want to choose?

function includes(k, strict) {
  strict = strict !== false; // default is true
  // strict = !!strict; // default is false
  for(var i=0; i < this.length; i++){
    if( (this[i] === k && strict) || 
        (this[i] == k && !strict) ||
        (this[i] !== this[i] && k !== k)
    ) {
      return true;
    }
  }
  return false;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Isn't this technique of augmenting built-in types frowned upon? – Sahat Oct 11 '12 at 3:49
2  
Buggy: [1,2,4].contains([].contains) is true. Also unnecessarily slow due to the same bug. Avoid for..in over arrays. – Eamon Nerbonne Jan 17 '13 at 15:02
    
@Eamon Nerbonne: I just pasted that code into jsfiddle.net and got false. Am I doing something wrong. Also, could you elaborate on how this bug slows the code down? Finally, I wasn't aware that there is a performance difference for "for..in" loops. Could you explain or direct me towards an article where I could read more? – threed Jan 18 '13 at 17:59
    
@threed totally untrue: "This is a very common practice and is used extensively by jQuery" - they create new prototypes for some objects they use, but NOT modify built-in prototypes – naugtur Feb 11 '13 at 13:18

Array.prototype.includes

In ES7, there is Array.prototype.includes.

Example

["Sam", "Great", "Sample", "High"].includes("Sam"); // true

Support

According to kangax it's available on Chrome 48, Firefox 44 and Node 5.0 and through babel and traceur and MDN provides a polyfill:

if (![].includes) {
  Array.prototype.includes = function(searchElement /*, fromIndex*/ ) {
    'use strict';
    var O = Object(this);
    var len = parseInt(O.length) || 0;
    if (len === 0) {
      return false;
    }
    var n = parseInt(arguments[1]) || 0;
    var k;
    if (n >= 0) {
      k = n;
    } else {
      k = len + n;
      if (k < 0) {k = 0;}
    }
    var currentElement;
    while (k < len) {
      currentElement = O[k];
      if (searchElement === currentElement ||
         (searchElement !== searchElement && currentElement !== currentElement)) {
        return true;
      }
      k++;
    }
    return false;
  };
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I'm tempted to post this answer across several javascript questions concerning multiple variable values or arrays. The polyfill from MDN is nice. – Nathan Goings Jul 3 '15 at 3:14
    
this works great. thanks! – Caleb Pitman Mar 1 at 20:59
    
thanks for this! Babel polyfils it nicely :-) I remember 2 years ago jQuery was in any project and nowadays it's Babel :) big win for JavaScript community! There's table of what's available of ES7 already on many platforms including babel pollyfils kangax.github.io/compat-table/es2016plus – Lukas Liesis Jul 12 at 9:52

Given the implementation of indexOf for IE (as described by eyelidlessness):

Array.prototype.contains = function(obj) {
    return this.indexOf(obj) > -1;
};
share|improve this answer
8  
That's redundant. – eyelidlessness Jul 25 '09 at 9:34
7  
Maybe, but it makes your code cleaner. if (myArray.contains(obj)) is easier to read and states the intent better than if (myArray.indexOf(obj) > -1). I definitively would implement both. – rlovtang Jul 25 '09 at 13:52
    
Does this work in all browsers? Or do some browsers consider the index of "2" and 2 the same? – threed Oct 11 '12 at 20:52

Since ECMAScript6, one can use Set :

var myArray = ['A', 'B', 'C'];
var mySet = new Set(myArray);
var hasB = mySet.has('B'); // true
var hasZ = mySet.has('Z'); // false
share|improve this answer

My little contribution:

function isInArray(array, search)
{
    return array.indexOf(search) >= 0;
}

//usage
if(isInArray(my_array, "my_value"))
{
    //...
}
share|improve this answer

You can use _.indexOf method or if you don't want to include whole Underscore.js library in your app, you can have a look how they did it and extract necessary code.

    _.indexOf = function(array, item, isSorted) {
    if (array == null) return -1;
    var i = 0, l = array.length;
    if (isSorted) {
      if (typeof isSorted == 'number') {
        i = (isSorted < 0 ? Math.max(0, l + isSorted) : isSorted);
      } else {
        i = _.sortedIndex(array, item);
        return array[i] === item ? i : -1;
      }
    }
    if (nativeIndexOf && array.indexOf === nativeIndexOf) return array.indexOf(item, isSorted);
    for (; i < l; i++) if (array[i] === item) return i;
    return -1;
  };
share|improve this answer

The answer provided didn't work for me, but it gave me an idea:

Array.prototype.contains = function(obj)
    {
        return (this.join(',')).indexOf(obj) > -1;
    }

It isn't perfect because items that are the same beyond the groupings could end up matching. Such as my example

var c=[];
var d=[];
function a()
{
    var e = '1';
    var f = '2';
    c[0] = ['1','1'];
    c[1] = ['2','2'];
    c[2] = ['3','3'];
    d[0] = [document.getElementById('g').value,document.getElementById('h').value];

    document.getElementById('i').value = c.join(',');
    document.getElementById('j').value = d.join(',');
    document.getElementById('b').value = c.contains(d);
}

When I call this function with the 'g' and 'h' fields containing 1 and 2 respectively, it still finds it because the resulting string from the join is: 1,1,2,2,3,3

Since it is doubtful in my situation that I will come across this type of situation, I'm using this. I thought I would share incase someone else couldn't make the chosen answer work either.

share|improve this answer
    
This solution seems very fragile and prone to error in all but the most narrow cases. Imagine, for example, using this array: var arr = ["Smith, Reed", "Jackson, Frank"]; arr.contains(searchTerm); Image that some user accidentally typed "Reed,Jackson" instead of "Reed, Jackson" in some text field that searched through this array. This algorithm would return a false positive and the user would think that Reed, Jackson actually existed when it doesn't. Cases like this are why this algorithm is much more prone to bugs. – threed Jan 5 at 0:33

Another option would be to use Array.some (if available) in the following way:

Array.prototype.contains = function(obj) {
  return this.some( function(e){ return e === obj } );
}

The anonymous function passed to Array.some will return true if and only if there is an element in the array that is identical to obj. Absent such an element, the function will not return true for any of the elements of the array, so Array.some will return false as well.

share|improve this answer

Using array .map function that executes a function for every value in an array seems cleanest to me.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/map

This method can work well both for simple arrays and for arrays of objects where you need to see if a key/value exists in an array of objects.

function inArray(myArray,myValue){
    var inArray = false;
    myArray.map(function(key){
        if (key === myValue){
            inArray=true;
        }
    });
    return inArray;
};

var anArray = [2,4,6,8]
console.log(inArray(anArray, 8)); // returns true
console.log(inArray(anArray, 1)); // returns false

function inArrayOfObjects(myArray,myValue,objElement){
    var inArray = false;
    myArray.map(function(arrayObj){
        if (arrayObj[objElement] === myValue) {
            inArray=true;
        }
    });
    return inArray;
};

var objArray = [{id:4,value:'foo'},{id:5,value:'bar'}]
console.log(inArrayOfObjects(objArray, 4, 'id')); // returns true
console.log(inArrayOfObjects(objArray, 'bar', 'value')); // returns true
console.log(inArrayOfObjects(objArray, 1, 'id')); // returns false
share|improve this answer

Wow, there are a lot of great answers to this question.

I didn't see one that takes a reduce approach so I'll add it in:

var searchForValue = 'pig';

var valueIsInArray = ['horse', 'cat', 'dog'].reduce(function(previous, current){
    return previous || searchForValue === current ? true : false;
}, false);

console.log('The value "' + searchForValue + '" is in the array: ' + valueIsInArray);

Here's a fiddle of it in action.

share|improve this answer
    
I was actually thinking about going this route, but it still has to transverse the entire array even when a result is found. – cgatian Mar 10 at 14:06
    
@cgatian that's a good point. It's def something to keep in mind when picking which method to use. You could potentially wrap the reduce statement in a try catch block and throw an exception once you've found the value, but if you do that I think you lose some of the simplicity that the functional approach gives you. – Chris Schmitz Mar 10 at 14:16

If you have access to ECMA 5 you can use the some method.

MDN SOME Method Link

arrValues = ["Sam","Great", "Sample", "High"];

function namePresent( name ){
  return name === this.toString();
}

arrValues.some( namePresent, 'Sam' );
=> true;
share|improve this answer
function setFound(){   
 var l = arr.length, textBox1 = document.getElementById("text1");
    for(var i=0; i<l;i++)
    {
     if(arr[i]==searchele){
      textBox1 .value = "Found";
      return;
     }
    }
    textBox1 .value = "Not Found";
return;
}

This program checks whether the given element is found or not. Id text1 represents id of textbox and searchele represents element to be searched (got fron user); if you want index, use i value

share|improve this answer
4  
Please give the explanation to your code. Code only answers are not appreciated – Sulthan Allaudeen Jul 24 '14 at 8:46
1  
This program checks whether the given element is found or not. Id text1 represents id of textbox and searchele represents element to be searched (got fron user); if you want index, use i value. – deeban Jul 24 '14 at 8:52
1  
Please update it in your answer. – Sulthan Allaudeen Jul 24 '14 at 8:56

The simplest solution for a contains function, would be a function that looks like this :

var contains = function (haystack, needle) {
    return !!~haystack.indexOf(needle);
}

Ideally, you wouldn't make this a stand-alone function, though, but part of a helper library :

var helper = {};

helper.array = {
    contains : function (haystack, needle) {
        return !!~haystack.indexOf(needle);
    }, 
    ...
};

Now, if you happen to be one of those unlucky people who still needs to support IE<9 and thus can't rely on indexOf, you could use this polyfill, which I got from the MDN :

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf) {
  Array.prototype.indexOf = function(searchElement, fromIndex) {
    var k;
    if (this == null) {
      throw new TypeError('"this" is null or not defined');
    }
    var o = Object(this);
    var len = o.length >>> 0;
    if (len === 0) {
      return -1;
    }
    var n = +fromIndex || 0;

    if (Math.abs(n) === Infinity) {
      n = 0;
    }
    if (n >= len) {
      return -1;
    }
    k = Math.max(n >= 0 ? n : len - Math.abs(n), 0);
    while (k < len) {
      if (k in o && o[k] === searchElement) {
        return k;
      }
      k++;
    }
    return -1;
  };
}
share|improve this answer

I highly recommend this -

if(/Element/g.test(Array)){---}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a pretty bad idea. There's already a pretty standard Array.prototype.indexOf method that can be used to accomplish this. There's even a free poly-fill for ancient versions of IE. – cpburnz May 14 '15 at 18:23
    
Sure, there is. I prefer it because this piece of code is much more compact. That's all. – Animesh Kumar May 14 '15 at 20:28
1  
Can you guys tell me why is it so bad? Because i have implemened it at some places. So if if there's something I dont know, it would be great if you can throw some light. – Animesh Kumar May 19 '15 at 9:00
    
var arr = ["Smith, Jane", "Jones, Frank"]; /Jane\,Jones/g.test(arr); This code returns a false positive. – threed Jan 5 at 0:38

I prefer simplicity:

var days = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
if ( 2 in days ) {console.log('weekday');}
share|improve this answer
6  
He wants to find a value in an array, not an index. So this won't do the job, even if it is simple. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – Ashley Davis Jun 18 '14 at 22:20

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