Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i need to determine if a value exists in an array using javascript.

I am using the following function:

Array.prototype.contains = function(obj) {
    var i = this.length;
    while (i--) {
        if (this[i] == obj) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

The above function always returns false.

The array values and the function call is as below

arrValues = ["Sam","Great", "Sample", "High"]
alert(arrValues.contains("Sam"));

Please suggest what to do

share|improve this question
7  
The code works in Safari 4.0.2. BTW: I'd do a === comparison instead of just ==. –  Georg Schölly Jul 25 '09 at 8:45
1  
"The above function always returns false." No it doesn't: The function works as expected - the error must be somewhere else. –  Christoph Jul 25 '09 at 8:59
1  
See also: stackoverflow.com/q/237104/1569 –  Factor Mystic Feb 18 '11 at 21:08
1  
Finally its worked. its due to improper trim of the comparing value. there was some space in the comparing value (A comment from the asker, to the accepted answer.) –  ANeves Oct 1 '12 at 9:09

12 Answers 12

up vote 425 down vote accepted
arrValues.indexOf('Sam') > -1

IE 8 and below do not have the Array.prototype.indexOf method. For these versions of IE use:

if(!Array.prototype.indexOf) {
    Array.prototype.indexOf = function(needle) {
        for(var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
            if(this[i] === needle) {
                return i;
            }
        }
        return -1;
    };
}

Edit after a long time: It's best not to patch the prototype of native primitives in JavaScript. A better way:

var indexOf = function(needle) {
    if(typeof Array.prototype.indexOf === 'function') {
        indexOf = Array.prototype.indexOf;
    } else {
        indexOf = function(needle) {
            var i = -1, index = -1;

            for(i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
                if(this[i] === needle) {
                    index = i;
                    break;
                }
            }

            return index;
        };
    }

    return indexOf.call(this, needle);
};

You can use it like this:

var myArray = [0,1,2],
    needle = 1,
    index = indexOf.call(myArray, needle); // 1

The function will detect the presence of a native indexOf method, once, then overwrite itself with either the native function or the shim.

share|improve this answer
2  
Note that indexOf on arrays is not implemented in IE, but you can define it yourself –  RaYell Jul 25 '09 at 8:36
5  
you should use a typed comparison with === to be compatible with the native implementation –  Christoph Jul 25 '09 at 9:08
2  
fixed the comparison and added the missing return -1; please note that according to the ES5 spec, this method will behave differently from the native one in case ofsigned zeroes and NaNs (see 15.4.4.14 and 9.12 vs. 11.9.6) –  Christoph Jul 25 '09 at 9:26
3  
What version of IE does this answer refer to? –  Daniel Allen Langdon Feb 24 '12 at 22:20
3  
@RiceFlourCookies, IE < 9. –  eyelidlessness Feb 25 '12 at 0:54

jQuery has a utility function for this:

$.inArray(value, array)

Returns index of value in array. Returns -1 if array does not contain value.

See also array.contains(obj) in JavaScript

share|improve this answer
61  
Don't let the name "inArray" fool you. As mentioned above (but of course I didn't read closely enough), returns -1 (not false) if the element doesn't exist. –  Greg Bernhardt Apr 19 '11 at 20:13
20  
I can't believe they named the function so badly. –  Steve Paul Jun 6 '13 at 8:23
1  
@Steve Paul what is wrong with name? it does what it says: -1=it's NOT there, anything else= it's there –  Jeffz Jun 22 '13 at 18:09
43  
'inArray' implies that a boolean will be returned indicating whether the element could be found in the array. Therefore users may feel tempted to use the expression: if ($.inArray('myval', myarray)) {...} This will evaluate to true if 'myval' is NOT in myarray. Furthermore, it will evaluate to false if myval's index is 0. –  Steve Paul Jun 24 '13 at 5:11
3  
The non-booleanness of $.inArray's return definitely feels like a mistake on jQuery's part. Surely, it ought to be renamed to $.indexOf, if that's the function it's polyfilling? –  ChaseMoskal Mar 7 at 23:01

An option that accounts for different types within the array (corrected to make p local to the for-loop):

Array.prototype.contains = function(k) {
  for(var i=0; i < this.length; i++){
    if(this[i] === k){
      return true;
    }
  }
  return false;
}

for example:

var list = ["one",2];

list.contains("one") // returns true
list.contains("2") // returns false
list.contains(2) // returns true
share|improve this answer
2  
Isn't this technique of augmenting built-in types frowned upon? –  Twilight Pony Inc. Oct 11 '12 at 3:49
3  
Why does p have to pollute the global scope? –  Micah Henning Nov 24 '12 at 1:22
    
Good point Micah. I've modified the code to make p local. –  threed Nov 26 '12 at 18:56
1  
Buggy: [1,2,4].contains([].contains) is true. Also unnecessarily slow due to the same bug. Avoid for..in over arrays. –  Eamon Nerbonne Jan 17 '13 at 15:02
    
@Eamon Nerbonne: I just pasted that code into jsfiddle.net and got false. Am I doing something wrong. Also, could you elaborate on how this bug slows the code down? Finally, I wasn't aware that there is a performance difference for "for..in" loops. Could you explain or direct me towards an article where I could read more? –  threed Jan 18 '13 at 17:59

This is generally what the indexOf() method is for. You would say:

if (arrValues.indexOf('Sam') > -1) {return true;}
else {return false;}
share|improve this answer
19  
you can reduce that to: return (arrValues.indexOf('Sam') > -1); –  Kenneth J Apr 22 '10 at 19:34

Given the implementation of indexOf for IE (as described by eyelidlessness):

Array.prototype.contains = function(obj) {
    return this.indexOf(obj) > -1;
};
share|improve this answer
4  
That's redundant. –  eyelidlessness Jul 25 '09 at 9:34
3  
Maybe, but it makes your code cleaner. if (myArray.contains(obj)) is easier to read and states the intent better than if (myArray.indexOf(obj) > -1). I definitively would implement both. –  rlovtang Jul 25 '09 at 13:52
    
Does this work in all browsers? Or do some browsers consider the index of "2" and 2 the same? –  threed Oct 11 '12 at 20:52

You can use _.indexOf method or if you don't want to include whole Underscore.js library in your app, you can have a look how they did it and extract necessary code.

    _.indexOf = function(array, item, isSorted) {
    if (array == null) return -1;
    var i = 0, l = array.length;
    if (isSorted) {
      if (typeof isSorted == 'number') {
        i = (isSorted < 0 ? Math.max(0, l + isSorted) : isSorted);
      } else {
        i = _.sortedIndex(array, item);
        return array[i] === item ? i : -1;
      }
    }
    if (nativeIndexOf && array.indexOf === nativeIndexOf) return array.indexOf(item, isSorted);
    for (; i < l; i++) if (array[i] === item) return i;
    return -1;
  };
share|improve this answer

The answer provided didn't work for me, but it gave me an idea:

Array.prototype.contains = function(obj)
    {
        return (this.join(',')).indexOf(obj) > -1;
    }

It isn't perfect because items that are the same beyond the groupings could end up matching. Such as my example

var c=[];
var d=[];
function a()
{
    var e = '1';
    var f = '2';
    c[0] = ['1','1'];
    c[1] = ['2','2'];
    c[2] = ['3','3'];
    d[0] = [document.getElementById('g').value,document.getElementById('h').value];

    document.getElementById('i').value = c.join(',');
    document.getElementById('j').value = d.join(',');
    document.getElementById('b').value = c.contains(d);
}

When I call this function with the 'g' and 'h' fields containing 1 and 2 respectively, it still finds it because the resulting string from the join is: 1,1,2,2,3,3

Since it is doubtful in my situation that I will come across this type of situation, I'm using this. I thought I would share incase someone else couldn't make the chosen answer work either.

share|improve this answer

It's almost always safe to use a library like underscore.js, simply because of all the issues with cross-browser compatibilities and effieciency.

Efficiency because you can be guaranteed that at any given time, a hugely popular library like underscore will have the most efficient method of accomplishing a utility function like this.

_.contains([1, 2, 3], 3); // returns true
share|improve this answer
    
You should be a salesman :D –  Alexandru Severin Sep 10 at 11:44

My little contribution:

function isInArray(array, search)
{
    return (array.indexOf(search) >= 0) ? true : false; 
}

//usage
if(isInArray(my_array, "my_value"))
{
    //...
}
share|improve this answer

I prefer simplicity:

var days = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
if ( 2 in days ) {console.log('weekday');}
share|improve this answer
1  
He wants to find a value in an array, not an index. So this won't do the job, even if it is simple. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… –  Ashley Davis Jun 18 at 22:20
var check = false;
for(var i=0; i<arr.length;i++)
{
if(arr[i]==searchele)
check = true;
 }

if(check==true)
document.getElementById("text1").value = "Found";
else
document.getElementById("text1").value = "Not Found";
share|improve this answer
    
Please give the explanation to your code. Code only answers are not appreciated –  Sulthan Allaudeen Jul 24 at 8:46
    
This program checks whether the given element is found or not. Id text1 represents id of textbox and searchele represents element to be searched (got fron user); if you want index, use i value. –  deeban Jul 24 at 8:52
    
Please update it in your answer. –  Sulthan Allaudeen Jul 24 at 8:56

If the list is fixed, you can use the native hasOwnProperty

var arrValues = {Alpha:0, Beta:0, Gamma:0};
alert(arrValues.hasOwnProperty("Beta"));
share|improve this answer
6  
the is not an array. its a hash-map –  Kumar Harsh Sep 21 '12 at 7:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.