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I'm working on a project that needs to implement few numerical methods in FORTRAN. For this, I need to write some recursive functions. Here is my code.

!     
! File:   main.F95
!

RECURSIVE FUNCTION integrate(n) RESULT(rv)
    IMPLICIT NONE
    DOUBLE PRECISION :: rv
    INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: n
    DOUBLE PRECISION, PARAMETER :: minusone = -1.0
    IF (n == 1) THEN
        rv = 10 !exp(minusone)
        RETURN
    ELSE
        rv = 1 - (n * integrate(n - 1))
        RETURN
    END IF
END FUNCTION integrate

RECURSIVE FUNCTION factorial(n) RESULT(res)
    INTEGER res, n
    IF (n .EQ. 0) THEN
        res = 1
    ELSE
        res = n * factorial(n - 1)
    END IF
END

PROGRAM main
    DOUBLE PRECISION :: rv1
    PRINT *, factorial(5)
    PRINT *, integrate(2)

    !READ *, rv1

END PROGRAM main

For this program the output is:

         NaN
       1

If i change the order of the print statements (line 30 & 31), the output will be:

         1
-19.000000

Output should be (for the original print statement order):

  120  
  -19 

I took the factorial function from the Wikipedia Fortran 95 language features page. I'm new in FORTRAN, I don't know what's wrong in my code. Please help me guys.

  • Compiler : gfortran 4.5.3 with Cygwin
  • IDE: Netbeans 7.0.1
  • Platform: Windows 7

Thank you in advance.

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Very good question, showing a recursive function feature and attention to detail. THANK YOU. –  user649198 Jan 28 at 22:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your functions are written correctly. The problem is in the main program, where you do not explicitly declare the type of integrate and factorial functions, so you have implicit typing, in which case factorial is assumed REAL and integrate is assumed INTEGER. For some reason, your compiler did not warn you about type mismatch. Mine did:

$ gfortran recurs.f90 
recurs.f90:26.22:

    PRINT *, integrate(2)
                      1
Error: Return type mismatch of function 'integrate' at (1) (INTEGER(4)/REAL(8))
recurs.f90:27.22:

    PRINT *, factorial(5)
                      1
Error: Return type mismatch of function 'factorial' at (1) (REAL(4)/INTEGER(4))

You should change your main program to:

PROGRAM main
    IMPLICIT NONE
    DOUBLE PRECISION, EXTERNAL :: integrate
    INTEGER, EXTERNAL :: factorial
    PRINT *, factorial(5)
    PRINT *, integrate(2)
END PROGRAM main

Notice the IMPLICIT NONE line. This declaration statement will disable any implicit typing, and the compiler would throw an error if not all variables and functions are explicitly declared. This is a very important line in every Fortran program, and if you had it, you would've figured out your problem yourself, because it would force you to explicitly declare everything in your program.

The output now is:

         120
  -19.0000000000000     

as expected.

As a side note, the DOUBLE PRECISION type declaration is not as flexible as using REAL with KIND parameter specified instead, e.g. anREAL(KIND=myRealKind). See answers to this question about how to use KIND properly: Fortran 90 kind parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you @IRO-bot, that worked very well, thankx. –  Sajith Janaprasad Aug 5 '12 at 12:54
    
@SajithJanaprasad You're welcome. Notice that when someone's answer is useful, you can also upvote by clicking on the up arrow in the top left corner of the answer. –  IRO-bot Aug 5 '12 at 12:56
    
Yeah, I know. I clicked the up arrow, but I can't upvote, because I don't have 15 reputation. Sorry buddy. Thankx again for the side note. –  Sajith Janaprasad Aug 5 '12 at 13:07
    
@SajithJanaprasad Oh silly me. No worries :). –  IRO-bot Aug 5 '12 at 13:11
1  
Oh.... this dam FORTRAN drive me crazy!!! :@ Any way, thankx guys –  Sajith Janaprasad Aug 5 '12 at 13:29

As one of the comments mentions, a better solution is to put your subroutines and functions into a module, then use that module from your main program. This will make the interface of those procedures known to the caller -- "explicit" in Fortran terminology. Not only will the compiler correctly handle the type of the function, it will be able to check type-agreement between the arguments in the call and the arguments in the callee ("dummy arguments") for consistency.

If you use as many debugging options as possible the compiler will help you find mistakes. With gfortran, try: -O2 -fimplicit-none -Wall -Wline-truncation -Wcharacter-truncation -Wsurprising -Waliasing -Wimplicit-interface -Wunused-parameter -fwhole-file -fcheck=all -std=f2008 -pedantic -fbacktrace

module factorial_procs

   IMPLICIT NONE

contains

   RECURSIVE FUNCTION integrate(n) RESULT(rv)
       DOUBLE PRECISION :: rv
       INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: n

       IF (n == 1) THEN
           rv = 10
           RETURN
       ELSE
           rv = 1 - (n * integrate(n - 1))
           RETURN
       END IF
   END FUNCTION integrate

   RECURSIVE FUNCTION factorial(n) RESULT(res)
       INTEGER res, n
       IF (n .EQ. 0) THEN
           res = 1
       ELSE
           res = n * factorial(n - 1)
       END IF
   END

end module factorial_procs

PROGRAM main

    use factorial_procs

    implicit none

    PRINT *, factorial(5)
    PRINT *, integrate(2)

END PROGRAM main

You'll probably find that you can only calculate factorials of very small integers by straight forward multiplication using regular integers. One fix is to use a larger integer type, e.g.,

integer, parameter :: BigInt_K = selected_int_kind (18)

Just as you could modernize and use selected_real_kind instead of Double Precision.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for "use module" tip, It helped me to solve another problem. –  Sajith Janaprasad Aug 7 '12 at 22:15

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