Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I don't fully understand the purpose of using Git or Github; I know it helps to keep track of your changes and it's helpful for people collaborating with other people, but I don't collaborate with anybody so I don't know if this would be helpful for me.

I usually work as a web designer/developer but I never have to collaborate. I know in Git you have create, push, commit, create branches etc for every repository but...

  1. What is the difference between Git and GitHub?

  2. Is git saving every repository locally (in the user's machine) and in GitHub?

  3. Can you use Git without GitHub? If yes, what would be the benefit for using GitHub?

  4. How does Git compare to a backup system such as Time Machine?

  5. Is this a manual process, in other words if you don't commit you wont have a new version of the changes made?

  6. If are not collaborating and you are already using a backup system why would you use Git?

share|improve this question

closed as too broad by random, gnat, EdChum, ScottJShea, Jackson Aug 4 '14 at 8:26

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 120 down vote accepted
  1. What is the difference between Git and GitHub?

    Git is a version control system; think of it as a series of snapshots (commits) of your code. You see a path of these snapshots, in which order they where created. You can make branches to experiment and come back to snapshots you took.

    GitHub, is a web-page on which you can publish your Git repositories and collaborate with other people.

  2. Is Git saving every repository locally (in the user's machine) and in GitHub?

    No, it's only local. You can decide to push (publish) some branches on GitHub.

  3. Can you use Git without GitHub? If yes, what would be the benefit for using GitHub?

    Yes, Git runs local if you don't use GitHub. An alternative to using GitHub could be running Git on files hosted on Dropbox, but GitHub is a more streamlined service as it was made especially for Git.

  4. How does Git compare to a backup system such as Time Machine?

    It's a different thing, Git lets you track changes and your development process. If you use Git with GitHub, it becomes effectively a backup. However usually you would not push all the time to GitHub, at which point you do not have a full backup if things go wrong. I use git in a folder that is synchronized with Dropbox.

  5. Is this a manual process, in other words if you don't commit you won't have a new version of the changes made?

    Yes, committing and pushing are both manual.

  6. If are not collaborating and you are already using a backup system why would you use Git?

    • If you encounter an error between commits you can use the command git diff to see the differences between the current code and the last working commit, helping you to locate your error.

    • You can also just go back to the last working commit.

    • If you want to try a change, but are not sure that it will work. You create a branch to test you code change. If it works fine, you merge it to the main branch. If it does not you just throw the branch away and go back to the main branch.

    • You did some debugging. Before you commit you always look at the changes from the last commit. You see your debug print statement that you forgot to delete.

Make sure you check gitimmersion.com.

share|improve this answer
3  
Section one in the last paragraph is really a good point. Also checkout git intersect for this purpose. –  user529758 Aug 9 '12 at 7:29
    
Thank you all for the good information. I now understand it better. –  fs_tigre Aug 18 '12 at 12:55
1  
@H2CO3 Do you mean git bisect? –  Simon Whitaker Dec 23 '12 at 12:17
    
@SimonWhitaker Yes, that's a typo. –  user529758 Dec 23 '12 at 12:21
1  
This is an excellent answer, thanks! I'm always forwarding this when somebody asks "what is Git?" (DRY for the win.) –  Leif Mar 20 '13 at 11:41
  1. What is the difference between Git and GitHub?

    Linus Torvalds would kill you for this. Git is the name of the version manager program he wrote. GitHub is a website on which there are source code repositories manageable by Git. Thus, GitHub is completely unrelated to the original Git tool.

  2. Is git saving every repository locally (in the user's machine) and in GitHub?

    If you commit changes, it stores locally. Then, if you push the commits, it also sotres them remotely.

  3. Can you use Git without GitHub? If yes, what would be the benefit for using GitHub?

    You can, but I'm sure you don't want to manually set up a git server for yourself. Benefits of GitHub? Well, easy to use, lot of people know it so others may find your code and follow/fork it to make improvements as well.

  4. How does Git compare to a backup system such as Time Machine?

    Git is specifically designed and optimized for source code.

  5. Is this a manual process, in other words if you don't commit you wont have a new version of the changes made?

    Exactly.

  6. If are not collaborating and you are already using a backup system why would you use Git?

    See #4.

share|improve this answer
4  
Actually, you can use git entirely local. The only reason, why you would use github is to publish your source code. For example for collaboration. If you do not want to do that you do not need a git server. –  Davoud Taghawi-Nejad Aug 5 '12 at 21:12
    
@DavoudTaghawi-Nejad yes but I'm sure OP was referring to 'without Github' as 'not specifically with GitHub'. I also believe that it's obvious from #2 that you can use git locally only. –  user529758 Aug 5 '12 at 21:14
4  
@DavoudTaghawi-Nejad I use github as a backup, not for collaboration. If there's a fire/etc code is safe. –  Thufir Aug 9 '12 at 6:02
  1. What is the difference between Git and GitHub?

    Git is a distributed version control system. It usually runs at the command line of your local machine. It keeps track of your files and modifications to those files in a "repository" (or "repo"), but only when you tell it to do so. (In other words, you decide which files to track and when to take a "snapshot" of any modifications.)

    In contrast, GitHub is a website that allows you to publish your Git repositories online, which can be useful for many reasons (see #3).

  2. Is Git saving every repository locally (in the user's machine) and in GitHub?

    Git is known as a "distributed" (rather than "centralized") version control system because you can run it locally and disconnected from the Internet, and then "push" your changes to a remote system (such as GitHub) whenever you like. Thus, repo changes only appear on GitHub when you manually tell Git to push those changes.

  3. Can you use Git without GitHub? If yes, what would be the benefit for using GitHub?

    Yes, you can use Git without GitHub. Git is the "workhorse" program that actually tracks your changes, whereas GitHub is simply hosting your repositories (and provides additional functionality not available in Git). Here are some of the benefits of using GitHub:

    • It provides a backup of your files.
    • It gives you a visual interface for navigating your repos.
    • It gives other people a way to navigate your repos.
    • It makes repo collaboration easy (e.g., multiple people contributing to the same project).
    • It provides a lightweight issue tracking system.
  4. How does Git compare to a backup system such as Time Machine?

    Git does backup your files, though it gives you much more granular control than a traditional backup system over what and when you backup. Specifically, you "commit" every time you want to take a snapshot of changes, and that commit includes both a description of your changes and the line-by-line details of those changes. This is optimal for source code because you can easily see the change history for any given file at a line-by-line level.

  5. Is this a manual process, in other words if you don't commit you won't have a new version of the changes made?

    Yes, this is a manual process.

  6. If are not collaborating and you are already using a backup system why would you use Git?

    • Git employs a powerful branching system that allows you to work on multiple, independent lines of development simultaneously and then merge those branches together as needed.
    • Git allows you to view the line-by-line differences between different versions of your files, which makes troubleshooting easier.
    • Git forces you to describe each of your commits, which makes it significantly easier to track down a specific previous version of a given file (and potentially revert to that previous version).
    • If you ever need help with your code, having it tracked by Git and hosted on GitHub makes it much easier for someone else to look at your code.

For getting started with Git, I recommend the online book Pro Git as well as GitRef as a handy reference guide. For getting started with GitHub, I like the GitHub's Bootcamp and their GitHub Guides. Finally, I created a short videos series to introduce Git and GitHub to beginners.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.